The Michael Kelly Award

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Shane Bauer of Mother Jones Wins Atlantic Media’s 2017 Michael Kelly Award

Honored for Reporting on Conditions in Private Prison in Louisiana

Washington, D.C. (April 10, 2017)— Shane Bauer of Mother Jones is the winner of Atlantic Media’s 2017 Michael Kelly Award for reporting on life inside a medium-security private prison in Louisiana, where he served as a correctional officer for four months. The $25,000 first place award was announced at a ceremony in Washington last night.

 
Determined to chronicle the everyday realities inside a private prison, Bauer applied for a job as a $9-an-hour prison guard using his own name and work history. His resulting piece, “My Four Months as a Private Prison Guard,” depicted a facility barely able to function under the cost-cutting pressures from the nation’s second largest prison company. As he struggled to maintain his humanity in a setting where physical and emotional assault was all too commonplace, Bauer’s reporting revealed how insufficient staffing increased danger for guards and prisoners alike.

 
“Shane Bauer provided a public service by giving readers an unvarnished look inside a corporate-run prison. Michael Kelly would have greatly admired his determination and courage in reporting this important story,” the judges said.

 
Given annually, the $25,000 Michael Kelly Award honors journalists whose work exemplifies the fearless pursuit and expression of truth, qualities that defined Michael Kelly’s own career. Kelly, who served as editor of two Atlantic Media publications, The Atlantic and National Journal, was the first journalist killed while covering the beginning of the Iraq War in 2003.

 
Five judges selected the finalists and the winner: Susan Davis, a congressional reporter with NPR; Charles Green, former editor of National Journal; Susan Mercandetti, editor-at-large at Random House; Cullen Murphy, editor-at-large of Vanity Fair; and Michael Phillips, a staff reporter with The Wall Street Journal and past finalist for the Michael Kelly Award.

 
Journalists with three other news organizations were recognized at the awards ceremony as finalists: Hannah Dreier of the Associated Press for her coverage of the impact of the economic crisis in Venezuela on residents struggling to find food and health care; David Fahrenthold of The Washington Post for a series of investigative pieces on Donald Trump’s deceptive charitable activities; and Selam Gebrekidan, Stephen Grey, and Amina Ismail of Reuters for a series of stories on the smuggling networks that profit from the transport of refugees from Africa and the Middle East to Europe.

 
Based in Washington, D.C., and New York City, Atlantic Media’s portfolio includes The Atlantic, CityLab, Quartz, National Journal Group, Government Executive, and Defense One. Atlantic Media publications and journalists are ineligible for the Michael Kelly Award.

 
Additional information about the Michael Kelly Award can be found at www.kellyaward.com. This press release can also be found here.

 

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Media Contact:

Sydney Simon

ssimon@theatlantic.com // 202-266-7338

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Atlantic Media Announces Finalists for the 2017 Michael Kelly Award

Reporting from the Associated Press, Mother Jones, Reuters, and The Washington Post Recognized for Fearless Pursuit and Expression of Truth in Journalism

First-Prize Winner to be Announced April 9

Washington, D.C. (March 22, 2017)—Atlantic Media has selected four finalists for its 14th annual Michael Kelly Award. Atlantic Media Chairman David Bradley created the award to celebrate the life and career of Michael Kelly, a former editor of two Atlantic Media publications—The Atlantic and National Journal—who was killed in Iraq while covering the war in 2003.

Selected from a highly competitive field of submissions, finalists were chosen by a panel of judges for work that displays the courage, determination, and passion exemplified by Kelly. The 2017 finalists are:

  • Shane Bauer of Mother Jones for his investigation of a resource-starved private prison in Louisiana where he spent four months as a correctional officer.
  • Hannah Dreier of the Associated Press for her coverage of the impact of the economic crisis in Venezuela on residents struggling to find food and health care.
  • David Fahrenthold of The Washington Post for a series of investigative pieces on Donald Trump’s deceptive charitable activities.
  • Selam Gebrekidan, Stephen Grey, and Amina Ismail of Reuters for a series of stories on the smuggling networks that profit from the transport of refugees from Africa and the Middle East to Europe.

The finalists will be honored at a ceremony in Washington, D.C. on April 9, when the winner of the $25,000 first place prize will be announced. The finalists will each receive $3,000.

Five judges selected the finalists: Susan Davis, a congressional reporter with NPR; Charles Green, former editor of National Journal; Susan Mercandetti, editor-at-large at Random House; Cullen Murphy, editor-at-large of Vanity Fair; and Michael Phillips, a staff reporter with The Wall Street Journal and past finalist for the Michael Kelly Award. The finalists are all first-time honorees.

Headquartered in Washington, D.C. and New York City, Atlantic Media’s portfolio includes The Atlantic, CityLab, Defense One, Government Executive, National Journal, and Quartz. Atlantic Media brands are ineligible for the Michael Kelly Award.
Additional information about the Michael Kelly Award can be found at www.KellyAward.com

 

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Alissa J. Rubin of The New York Times Wins 2016 Michael Kelly Award

Honored for Reporting on the Treatment of Women in Post-War Afghanistan

Washington, D.C. (April 18, 2016)—Alissa J. Rubin is the winner of Atlantic Media’s 2016 Michael Kelly Award for a series of reports for The New York Times on the treatment of women in Afghanistan: from the mob killing of a woman wrongly accused of burning the Quran, to the female experience in the Afghan police. The award was announced at a ceremony in Washington last night.

A journalist with more than three decades of experience, Rubin shed light on the plight of women in Afghanistan, much of which she risked her own life to tell in illuminating and sensitive detail. Rubin’s reports on the mob murder of a woman falsely accused of burning the Quran, the efforts to incorporate women into the police force, and the legacy of Western-backed women’s shelters, reveals a much larger picture of the post-war landscape: one marred by a stark mismatch of Afghan culture and the American ideals forced upon it.

“Alissa Rubin’s work displays the same kind of persistence and passion for truth that marked Michael Kelly’s career. In a year with an unusually large number of exceptional entries, her stories stood above the rest,” the judges said.

Given annually, the $25,000 Michael Kelly Award honors journalists whose work exemplifies the fearless pursuit and expression of truth, qualities that defined Michael Kelly’s own career. Kelly, who served as editor of two Atlantic Media publications, The Atlantic and National Journal, was the first journalist killed while covering the beginning of the Iraq War in 2003.

Five judges selected the finalists and the winner: James Gibney, editorial writer for Bloomberg View; Charles Green, former editor of National Journal; Cullen Murphy, editor-at-large of Vanity Fair; Mary Kane, adjunct professor at Johns Hopkins University; and John Fox Sullivan, former publisher of The Atlantic and National Journal.

Three other journalists were also commended as finalists: James Verini of The Atavist, Ian Urbina of The New York Times, and a group of reporters for the Associated Press: Martha Mendoza, Margie Mason, Robin McDowell, and Esther Htusan.

Based in Washington, D.C., and New York City, Atlantic Media’s portfolio includes The Atlantic, CityLab, Quartz, National Journal Group, and Government Executive and Defense One. Atlantic Media publications and journalists are ineligible for the Michael Kelly Award.

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Atlantic Media Announces Finalists for the 2016 Michael Kelly Award

Reporting from the Associated Press, The Atavist, and The New York Times Recognized for Fearless Pursuit and Expression of Truth in Journalism

First-Prize Winner to be Announced April 17

Washington, D.C. (March 29, 2016)— Atlantic Media has selected the finalists for its 13th annual Michael Kelly Award. Atlantic Media Chairman David Bradley created the award to celebrate the life and career of Michael Kelly, a former editor of two Atlantic Media publications—The Atlantic and National Journal—who was killed in Iraq while covering the war in 2003.

Selected from a highly-competitive field of submissions, finalists were chosen for work that displays the courage, determination, and passion exemplified by Kelly. The 2016 finalists are:

  • Martha Mendoza, Margie Mason, Robin McDowell, and Esther Htusan of the Associated Press for “Seafood from Slaves,” an investigation into how the seafood industry in Thailand uses slaves to catch or process seafood that ends up in the United States.
  • Alissa Rubin of The New York Times for her reporting on the treatment of women in Afghanistan — from the mob killing of a woman wrongly accused of burning the Quran to the female experience in the Afghan police.
  • Ian Urbina of The New York Times for “The Outlaw Ocean,” a series uncovering weak rules, lawlessness, and violence on the high seas.
  • James Verini of The Atavist Magazine for “The Doctor,” the story of an American-born doctor and sole surgeon at the only hospital in the war-torn region of Nuba in the south of Sudan.

The finalists will be honored at a ceremony in Washington, D.C. on April 17, when the winner of the $25,000 first place prize will be announced.

Five judges selected the finalists: James Gibney, editorial writer for Bloomberg View; Charles Green, former editor of National Journal; Cullen Murphy, editor-at-large of Vanity Fair; Mary Kane, adjunct professor at Johns Hopkins University; and John Fox Sullivan, former publisher of The Atlantic and National Journal. The finalists are all first time honorees.

Based in Washington, D.C., and New York City, Atlantic Media’s portfolio includes The Atlantic, CityLab, Quartz, National Journal Group, and Government Executive and Defense One. Atlantic Media publications and journalists are ineligible for the Michael Kelly Award.

Additional information about the Michael Kelly Award is at www.kellyaward.com.

 

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Rania Abouzeid Wins the 2015 Michael Kelly Award

Honored for “The Jihad Next Door” in Politico Magazine

Washington, D.C. (April 21, 2015)— Rania Abouzeid is the winner of Atlantic Media’s 2015 Michael Kelly Award for her reporting, “The Jihad Next Door,” published by Politico Magazine.

In her winning submission, Abouzeid, a freelance journalist with over a decade covering the Middle East, provides an unprecedented window into the resurgence of Jihadism in Syria—how Al-Qaeda affiliate Jabhat al-Nusra exploited a civil war to establish a tight foothold, creating ripple effects that continue to reverberate throughout the region. To report the story, Abouzeid worked alone in a war zone, handling her own fixing, translating, and logistics.

Describing Abouzeid, the judges said: “Like Mike, she has worked as a freelance reporter in some of the world’s most dangerous spots, because she wants the world to know what is taking place. She exemplifies the passion, courage, and commitment that were hallmarks of Mike’s career.”

Given annually, the $25,000 award honors journalists whose work exemplifies the fearless pursuit and expression of truth, a quality that defined Michael Kelly’s own career. Kelly, who served as editor of two Atlantic Media publications, The Atlantic and National Journal, was the first journalist killed while covering the beginning of the Iraq War in 2003.

This year’s panel of judges included Jeffrey Goldberg, national correspondent for The AtlanticCharles Green, contributing editor for National JournalCullen Murphy, editor-at-large of Vanity Fair; Mark Murray, senior political editor for NBC News; and Megan Twohey, investigative reporter for Thomson Reuters and 2014 Michael Kelly Award finalist.

Three other journalists were also commended as finalists: Matthieu Aikins of Matter and a Nation Institute Schell Fellow, Alex Campbell of BuzzFeed, and Dexter Filkins of The New Yorker. The winner and finalists were commended at a ceremony last night in Washington.

Based in Washington, D.C., and New York City, Atlantic Media’s portfolio includes The Atlantic, National Journal, Government Executive, Defense One, CityLab, and Quartz. Atlantic Media brands are ineligible for the Michael Kelly Award. For additional information, please visit www.kellyaward.com.

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Media Relations:

Sydney Simon, The Atlantic

(202) 266-7338

ssimon@theatlantic.com

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ATLANTIC MEDIA ANNOUNCES 2015 MICHAEL KELLY AWARD FINALISTS

Reporting for BuzzFeed, Matter, New Yorker, and Politico Magazine Commended; First Place Winner to Be Announced April 19

WASHINGTON, D.C. (March 26, 2015)–Atlantic Media has selected four finalists for its annual Michael Kelly Award, which honors the fearless pursuit and expression of truth in journalism.

Now in its twelfth year, the award was created by Atlantic Media Chairman David Bradley to celebrate the life and career of Michael Kelly, former editor of two Atlantic Media publications–The Atlantic and National Journal– who was killed in Iraq while covering the war in 2003.  The winner of the $25,000 first place prize will be announced at a ceremony in Washington, D.C., on April 19.

Selected from a record 91 entries, finalists’ work was chosen for displaying the courage, determination, and passion exemplified in Kelly’s dedication to journalism. The 2015 finalists are:

·         Rania Abouzeid, a freelance journalist, for “The Jihad Next Door” in Politico Magazine. The piece reports on how ISIS used the conflict in Syria to rejuvenate itself and become a regional threat.

·         Matthieu Aikins, a freelance journalist, for “Whoever Saves a Life” in Matter, an online magazine. Aikins writes of his experience embedding with a group of first responders in Aleppo, Syria, dealing with the city’s devastation.

·         Alex Campbell, an investigative reporter with BuzzFeed, for a series of stories on battered women sentenced to prison for failing to prevent their boyfriends or spouses from abusing their children.

·         Dexter Filkins, a staff writer with The New Yorker, for two articles on Iraq, one on then-Prime Minister of Nuri al-Maliki, the second on Iraq’s Kurds.

The panel of five judges included Jeffrey Goldberg, national correspondent for The Atlantic; Charles Green, contributing editor for National Journal; Cullen Murphy, editor-at-large of Vanity Fair; Mark Murray, senior political editor for NBC News; and Megan Twohey, investigative reporter for Thomson Reuters and 2014 Michael Kelly Award finalist.  Among the finalists, Abouzeid, Campbell, and Filkins are first-time honorees. Aikins was a finalist in 2014.

Based in Washington, D.C., and New York City, Atlantic Media’s portfolio includes The Atlantic, National Journal, Government Executive, Defense One, CityLab, and Quartz. Atlantic Media brands are ineligible for the Michael Kelly Award.

For additional information about the Michael Kelly Award please visit www.kellyaward.com or contact Sydney Simon (ssimon@theatlantic.com).

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Media Relations Contact:

Sydney Simon

The Atlantic

ssimon@theatlantic.com

202-266-7338 (o)/770-712-8104 (m)

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AP’s Rukmini Callimachi Wins the 2014 Michael Kelly Award for Coverage of al-Qaida in West Africa


Washington, D.C. (April 14, 2014)—Atlantic Media announced today that Rukmini Callimachi is this year’s recipient of the Michael Kelly Award for her work as the West Africa bureau chief for the Associated Press.

The $25,000 award is given annually to a journalist whose work exemplifies a quality that Michael Kelly exhibited throughout his own career: the fearless pursuit and expression of truth. Kelly, who was the editor of two Atlantic Media publications, The Atlantic and National Journal, was killed 11 years ago while covering the war in Iraq.

In her role as the AP’s West Africa bureau chief, Callimachi discovered a large trove of internal documents from al-Qaida illuminating the internal workings of the terrorist organization and its strategy for the region. Reporting from Mali, she tracked down the bodies of six victims shot by the military, forcing the Malian government to initiate an investigation.

“Michael Kelly would have greatly admired how Rukmini Callimachi has approached her work,” said the Kelly Award judges in a statement. “Like Mike, she has an eye for a great story, well-told. And, like Mike, she stands up to bullies who stand between her and the truth. Her fearless reporting from Africa exemplifies the best in foreign correspondence and the values that Michael Kelly passionately espoused.”

In addition to Callimachi, the panel of five judges recognized three other journalists as finalists, selected from a field of nearly 60 entries from U.S.-based media organizations: Matthieu Aikins for his work in Rolling StoneDave Philipps of the Colorado Springs Gazette, and Megan Twohey of Reuters.

The winner and finalists were honored at a dinner Sunday night in Washington hosted by Atlantic Media Chairman and CEO David Bradley.

This year’s panel of judges for the 2014 Michael Kelly Award included: Tish Durkin, freelance writer; Charles Green, contributing editor, National JournalBrian Mockenhaupt, freelance writer and winner of the 2013 Michael Kelly Award; Cullen Murphy, editor-at-large, Vanity Fair; and James Oliphant, White House correspondent, National Journal.

Additional information is available at http://www.kellyaward.com.

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Media Inquiries:
Emma Angerer
National Journal

202-266-7405
eangerer@nationaljournal.com

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ATLANTIC MEDIA ANNOUNCES FINALISTS
FOR 2014 MICHAEL KELLY AWARD
 
Writers from the Associated Press, the Colorado Springs Gazette, Reuters, and Rolling Stone Commended


WASHINGTON, D.C., March 27, 2014—Celebrating the fearless pursuit and expression of truth, Atlantic Media announces four finalists for the 11th annual Michael Kelly Award.

The $25,000 award will be presented at a ceremony on April 13. The award was created in honor of Michael Kelly, who was the editor of two Atlantic Media publications, The Atlantic and National Journal, and he was killed while covering the Iraq War in 2003.

The entries encompass work published in a U.S.-based newspaper, magazine, or online site in 2013.

Chosen from a field of nearly 60 entries, the finalists for the 2014 Michael Kelly Award are:

Matthieu Aikins, for his story in Rolling Stone about allegations of war crimes committed by a U.S. Army Special Forces unit in Afghanistan.

Rukmini Callimachi, for her work as the West Africa bureau chief for the Associated Press, including her reports on internal al-Qaida documents she discovered.

Dave Philipps, for his coverage in the Colorado Springs Gazette of combat veterans receiving other-than-honorable discharges from the military.

Megan Twohey of Reuters, for a series on parents who give away their internationally-adopted children through an underground Internet clearinghouse.

The finalists’ articles, as described by the five-member panel of judges, displayed the courage, determination, and passion that characterized Kelly’s journalism career. Aikins, Philipps, and Twohey are first-time honorees. This is the third time Callimachi has been selected as a finalist, more than any other journalist.

The five judges of the 2014 Michael Kelly Award:

  • Tish Durkin, freelance writer
  • Charles Green, contributing editor, National Journal
  • Brian Mockenhaupt, freelance writer and winner of the 2013 Michael Kelly Award
  • Cullen Murphy, editor-at-large, Vanity Fair
  • James Oliphant, White House correspondent, National Journal

Additional information about this year’s finalists is available at www.kellyaward.com

Atlantic Media is a Washington-based publishing company whose properties include The Atlantic, National Journal, Government Executive, Quartz, and Defense One


Media Inquiries:
Emma Angerer
National Journal
(202) 266-7405
eangerer@nationaljournal.com

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BRIAN MOCKENHAUPT WINS THE 2013 MICHAEL KELLY AWARD

Mockenhaupt Honored for Byliner.com’s “The Living and the Dead” on the War in Afghanistan

WASHINGTON, D.C., April 15, 2013 – Atlantic Media announced today that Brian Mockenhaupt is this year’s recipient of the Michael Kelly Award for his story, “The Living and the Dead,” published by Byliner.com.

The $25,000 award is given annually to a journalist whose work exemplifies a quality that animated Michael Kelly’s own career: the fearless pursuit and expression of truth. Kelly, who was the editor of two Atlantic Media publications, The Atlantic and National Journal, was killed 10 years ago while covering the war in Iraq.

In “The Living and the Dead,” Mockenhaupt tells the story of a Marine platoon in Afghanistan that suffered heavy casualties and the toll it took on those who survived. “Michael Kelly would have greatly admired the ambition of Mockenhaupt’s work, the courage he displayed in reporting the story, and the power of his writing,” said the Kelly Award judges in a statement. “It is fitting that on the tenth anniversary of Mike’s death, we are honoring a journalist whose work exemplifies many of the qualities that distinguished Mike’s own reporting from the battlefield.”

The judges also recognized three journalists as finalists, selected from a field of more than 60 entries from U.S.-based media organizations: Alberto Arce of the Associated Press, David Barboza of The New York Times, and Michael M. Phillips of The Wall Street Journal. The winner and finalists were honored at a dinner last night in Washington.

Five judges comprised this year’s Michael Kelly Award selection panel: James Fallows, national correspondent, The Atlantic; Charles Green, editor, National Journal; Cullen Murphy, editor at large, Vanity Fair; Sarah Stillman, staff writer, The New Yorker and 2012 winner of the Michael Kelly Award; and Scott Stossel, editor, The Atlantic magazine.

For additional information, including full entries and past winners, please visit www.kellyaward.com.

Atlantic Media Company is a Washington, D.C.-based publishing company whose flagship properties include The Atlantic, National Journal, and Government Executive.

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ATLANTIC MEDIA ANNOUNCES FINALISTS FOR 2013 MICHAEL KELLY AWARD

Writers from the Associated Press, Byliner.com, The New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal Commended for Pursuit of Truth in Journalism

WASHINGTON, D.C., March 21, 2013—Celebrating the fearless pursuit and expression of truth in journalism, Atlantic Media Company announces four finalists for the 10th annual Michael Kelly Award.

The $25,000 award will be given at a ceremony on April 14.The award was created in honor of Michael Kelly, who was the editor of two Atlantic Media publications, The Atlantic and National Journal, and was killed while covering the war in Iraq in 2003.

Chosen from a field of more than 60 entries, the finalists for the 2013 Michael Kelly Award are:
• Alberto Arce, the Associated Press. Arce is the only foreign correspondent in Honduras, one of the most violent countries in the world. Through a series of reports, he ventured into various corners of Honduran society to capture the corrosive daily violence, lack of justice, and political instability there.

• David Barboza, The New York Times. Barboza spent more than a year piecing together the finances of Chinese Prime Minister Wen Jiabao and discovered he had amassed a secret wealth of $2.7 billion. His articles caused a sensation in China and laid bare the weakness of the country’s entire political system.

• Brian Mockenhaupt, Byliner.com. Mockenhaupt, a former infantryman, wrote about a Marine platoon in Afghanistan that suffered heavy casualties and the toll it took on those who survived. The reporting for his piece stretched over 18 months, taking him from foot patrols in Northern Marjah to Camp Lejeune, N.C., where Marines struggled to reintegrate into the world they had left behind.

• Michael Phillips, The Wall Street Journal. Phillips wrote a series of stories from Afghanistan and the United States on the experiences of U.S. troops in combat and upon their return home. In one article, he described the bombing of a convoy in which he was riding. Phillips helped drag a wounded sergeant out of the street while under gunfire from insurgents.

Five judges comprised this year’s Michael Kelly Award selection panel:
• James Fallows, national correspondent, The Atlantic
• Charles Green, editor, National Journal
• Cullen Murphy, Editor-at-Large, Vanity Fair
• Sarah Stillman, staff writer, The New Yorker and 2012 winner of the Michael Kelly Award
• Scott Stossel, editor, The Atlantic magazine

For additional information, including full entries and past winners, please visit www.kellyaward.com.

Atlantic Media Company is a Washington, D.C.-based publishing company whose flagship properties include The Atlantic, National Journal, and Government Executive.

 

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SARAH STILLMAN WINS THE 2012 MICHAEL KELLY AWARD

Stillman Honored for New Yorker Piece on Mistreatment of Foreign Workers at U.S. Military Bases in Iraq and Afghanistan

WASHINGTON, D.C., April 17, 2012 – David Bradley, chairman of Atlantic Media Company, announced today that Sarah Stillman is this year’s recipient of the Michael Kelly Award for her story, published in The New Yorker, on the mistreatment of foreign contract workers at U.S. military bases in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The $25,000 award is given annually to a journalist whose work exemplifies a quality that animated Michael Kelly’s own career: the fearless pursuit and expression of truth. Kelly, who was the editor of two Atlantic Media publications, The Atlantic and National Journal, was killed while covering the war in Iraq in 2003.

In “The Invisible Army,” Sarah Stillman tells the story of ten Fijian beauticians who were recruited for lucrative jobs in a posh Dubai salon, only to end up in Iraq giving manicures and massages to U.S. soldiers.” Through their mistreatment, Stillman exposes the larger scandal of thousands of foreign workers on U.S. military bases reduced to something like indentured servitude,” said the Kelly Award judges in a statement. “Working as a freelance reporter without a contract, Stillman spent more than a year reporting the story, traveling to four countries, six military bases, and two war zones.”

The judges also recognized four journalists from other organizations as finalists: Rukmini Callimachi of the Associated Press, Kathy Dobie of Harper’s, and A.M. Sheehan and Matt Hongoltz-Hetling of the Advertiser Democrat (Norway, Maine). The winners and finalists were honored at a dinner last night in Washington at Atlantic Media Company headquarters. The finalists were selected from a field of 59 entries from journalists at U.S.-based newspapers and magazines.

A panel of five journalists served as judges for this year’s award: Charles Green, executive editor of National Journal; Mandy Locke, reporter at The News & Observer (Raleigh, N.C.) and co-winner of the 2011 Michael Kelly Award; Cullen Murphy, editor-at-large for Vanity Fair; Jonathan Rauch, a contributing editor for National Journal; and Alexis Simendinger, White House correspondent for RealClearPolitics.

For additional information, including full entries and past winners, please visit www.kellyaward.com.

Atlantic Media Company is a Washington, D.C.-based publishing company whose flagship properties include The Atlantic, National Journal, and Government Executive.

 

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ATLANTIC MEDIA ANNOUNCES FINALISTS FOR 2012 MICHAEL KELLY AWARD

Associated Press, Harper’s, Advertiser Democrat, New Yorker Writers Lauded for Pursuit of Truth in Journalism

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Honoring the fearless pursuit and expression of truth in journalism, the Atlantic Media Company announced today four finalists for the 9th annual Michael Kelly Award.

The $25,000 award will be given at a dinner at the company’s Watergate headquarters on April 15. The award was created in honor of Michael Kelly, who was the editor of two Atlantic Media publications, The Atlantic and National Journal, and was killed while covering the war in Iraq in 2003.

Chosen from a field of 59 entries, the finalists for the 2012 Michael Kelly Award are:

• Rukmini Callimachi, Associated Press, for her coverage of West Africa and strife in the Ivory Coast.

• Kathy Dobie, Harper’s magazine, about sexual abuse on Indian reservations.

• A.M. Sheehan and Matt Hongoltz-Hetling, Advertiser Democrat, for their series on substandard Section 8 housing in Maine.

• Sarah Stillman, New Yorker, for her piece on the mistreatment of contract workers at U.S. military bases in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Five judges comprised this year’s Michael Kelly Award selection panel:

Charles Green, Executive Editor, National Journal
Mandy Locke, Reporter, The News & Observer (Raleigh, N.C.) and co-winner of the 2011 Michael Kelly Award
Cullen Murphy, Editor-at-Large, Vanity Fair
Jonathan Rauch, Contributing Editor, National Journal
Alexis Simendinger, White House Correspondent, RealClearPolitics

For additional information, including full entries and past winners, please visit www.kellyaward.com.

Atlantic Media Company is a Washington, D.C.-based publishing company whose flagship properties include The Atlantic, National Journal, and Government Executive.

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MANDY LOCKE AND JOSEPH NEFF WIN THE 2011 MICHAEL KELLY AWARD

Raleigh News & Observer Team Honored for Series Exposing Misconduct at North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation

WASHINGTON, D.C., April 18, 2011 – David Bradley, chairman of Atlantic Media Company, announced today that Raleigh News & Observer reporters Mandy Locke and Joseph Neff are this year’s recipients of the Michael Kelly Award for their series exposing widespread misconduct at the State Bureau of Investigation (SBI) in North Carolina.

The $25,000 award is given annually to a journalist whose work exemplifies a quality that animated Michael Kelly’s own career: the fearless pursuit and expression of truth. Kelly, who was the editor of two Atlantic Media publications, The Atlantic and National Journal, was killed while covering the war in Iraq in 2003.

The reporting from Locke and Neff revealed that North Carolina SBI agents fabricated stories or cut corners to prove prosecutors’ theories, while lab examiners flouted accepted scientific techniques and withheld evidence to help build cases for prosecutors. In a statement, the award judges concluded:

“As a result of the series, top officials at the bureau have been fired or replaced and the SBI is rewriting its policies and procedures. The series was an example of the News & Observer’s exemplary criminal-justice reporting over the past several years—reporting that helped free a death row inmate and trigger the establishment of the nation’s first Innocence Inquiry Commission.”

The judges also recognized three journalists from other organizations as finalists: Emily Bazelon of Slate, John Bowe of Mother Jones, and Jonathan Katz of the Associated Press.The winners and finalists were honored at a dinner last night in Washington at Atlantic Media Company headquarters.

The finalists were selected from a field of more than 50 entries from journalists at U.S.-based newspapers and magazines.

A panel of five journalists served as judges for this year’s award: Sheri Fink, a reporter for ProPublica and a 2010 Michael Kelly Award finalist; Charles Green, executive editor of National Journal; Cullen Murphy, editor-at-large for Vanity Fair; David Rohde, a reporter for the New York Times and the 2010 Michael Kelly Award winner; and Stuart Taylor, Jr., a contributing editor for National Journal.

For additional information, including full entries and past winners, please visit www.kellyaward.com.
Atlantic Media Company is a Washington, D.C.-based publishing company whose flagship properties include The Atlantic, National Journal, and Government Executive.

 

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ATLANTIC MEDIA ANNOUNCES FINALISTS FOR 2011 MICHAEL KELLY AWARD

Slate, Mother Jones, Associated Press, and Raleigh News & Observer Writers Lauded for Pursuit of Truth in Journalism

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Celebrating the fearless pursuit and expression of truth in journalism, the Atlantic Media Company announces four finalists for the 8th annual Michael Kelly Awards.

The $25,000 award will be given at a ceremony at the company’s Washington, D.C. headquarters on April 17. The award was created in honor of Michael Kelly, who was the editor of two Atlantic Media publications, The Atlantic and National Journal and was killed while covering the war in Iraq in 2003.

Chosen from a field of 50 entries, the finalists for the 2011 Michael Kelly Award are:

• Emily Bazelon, Slate. In “What Really Happened to Phoebe Prince?” Emily Bazelon of Slate shows that the journalism establishment and the legal system both erred in ascribing the suicide of a 15-year-old girl in South Hadley, Mass. to bullying by her high school classmates. The notion of a clique of students driving a classmate to her death was a compelling narrative, but it wasn’t true. Bazelon’s reporting makes clear that prosecuting Prince’s classmates for what a troubled girl did to herself was an abuse of the law. Her meticulously reported account of Prince’s final months is a model of challenging conventional wisdom and grappling with a complicated situation in a thoughtful and well-rounded way.”

• John Bowe, Mother Jones. A result of a two-year investigation, John Bowe’s “Bound for America” exposed practices that amounted to human trafficking by a U.S. firm that recruited Thai farmers for agricultural jobs in the United States and charged them $10,000 to $20,000 apiece—plus interest—for job placement. After arriving here, the farmers worked only sporadically and didn’t earn enough to even cover their loan payments. Five months after the publication of Bowe’s story, which was supported by The Investigative Fund at The Nation Institute, a federal grand jury indicted company officials for engaging in “a conspiracy to commit forced labor.” The offices of the company, Global Horizons, are now closed.

• Jonathan Katz, Associated Press. Jonathan M. Katz was the only foreign correspondent stationed in Haiti when a powerful earthquake hit on January 12, 2010. From that moment—when he borrowed a cell phone to call in the news even though his house had collapsed around him—Katz covered the earthquake and its aftermath with resourcefulness and determination. Over the course of the next year, his reporting on stalled recovery efforts triggered the resignation of a government official and his revelations linking a cholera outbreak to U.N. peacekeepers forced the United Nations to appoint an independent panel to investigate the matter. His coverage represents foreign correspondence at its best.

• Mandy Locke and Joseph Neff, The Raleigh News & Observer. In their four-part series, “Agents’ Secrets,” Mandy Locke and Joseph Neff exposed widespread misconduct at the State Bureau of Investigation in North Carolina. Agents fabricated stories or cut corners to prove prosecutors’ theories. Lab examiners flouted accepted scientific techniques and withheld evidence to help build cases for prosecutors. As a result of the series, top officials at the bureau have been fired or replaced and the SBI is rewriting its policies and procedures. The series was an example of the News & Observer’s exemplary criminal-justice reporting over the past several years—reporting that helped free a death row inmate and trigger the establishment of the nation’s first Innocence Inquiry Commission.

Five judges comprised this year’s Michael Kelly Award selection panel:

Sheri Fink, Reporter, ProPublica; Finalist, 2010 Michael Kelly Award
Charles Green, Executive Editor, National Journal
Cullen Murphy, Editor-at-Large, Vanity Fair
David Rohde, Reporter, New York Times; Winner, 2010 Michael Kelly Award
Stuart Taylor, Jr., Contributing Editor, National Journal

For additional information, including full entries and past winners, please visit www.kellyaward.com.

Atlantic Media Company is a Washington, D.C.-based publishing company whose flagship properties include The Atlantic, National Journal, and Government Executive.

 

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DAVID ROHDE WINS 2010 MICHAEL KELLY AWARD

WASHINGTON, D.C. _ The Atlantic Media Company announced today that David Rohde of The New York Times is the winner of the 2010 Michael Kelly Award.

In a riveting five-part series, Rohde described how he and two Afghan colleagues were kidnapped by the Taliban outside Kabul and held for seven months before he and one of his colleagues escaped on foot to a Pakistani military base. Rohde was initially reluctant to write about his experience, telling his editors, “I don’t want to make myself look like a hero. I am not a hero.” But he bravely used his captivity to illuminate the world and minds of terrorists who repeatedly threatened to behead him and to provide insights into what Rohde termed a “Taliban mini-state” in the tribal areas of Pakistan.

“David Rohde epitomizes fearlessness in the pursuit of truth. He put himself in harm’s way to learn more about the Taliban. He responded bravely to his capture and seven-month captivity. And he displayed moral courage in reliving his ordeal through an unflinching five-part series. Michael Kelly would have been the first to admire his work,” said Charles Green, editor of National Journal and a Michael Kelly Award judge.

In addition to Rohde, the finalists for the award were:

• Ken Bensinger and Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times, for a series of reports on the problem of unintended acceleration in Toyotas.
• Sheri Fink, ProPublica, for a New York Times Magazine story on the harrowing days at Memorial Medical Center in New Orleans in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.
• Jeffrey Gettleman, The New York Times, for his coverage of East Africa.

Five judges comprised this year’s Michael Kelly Award selection panel:

Ken Armstrong, The Seattle Times
Siobhan Gorman, The Wall Street Journal
Charlie Green, National Journal
Kathy Kiely, USA Today
Cullen Murphy, Vanity Fair

For additional information, including full entries and past winners, please visit www.kellyaward.com.

Atlantic Media Company is a Washington, D.C.-based publishing company whose flagship properties include The Atlantic, National Journal, and Government Executive.

 

• • • • • • • • • • • •

ATLANTIC MEDIA ANNOUNCES FINALISTS FOR 2010 MICHAEL KELLY AWARD

Los Angeles Times, ProPublica and New York Times Writers Lauded for Pursuit of Truth in Journalism

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Celebrating the fearless pursuit and expression of truth in journalism, the Atlantic Media Company announces four finalists for the 7th annual Michael Kelly Awards.

The $25,000 award will be given at a ceremony at the company’s Washington, D.C. headquarters on April 18. The award was created in honor of Michael Kelly, who was the editor of two Atlantic Media publications, The Atlantic and National Journal and was killed while covering the war in Iraq in 2003.

Chosen from a field of 50 entries, the finalists for the 2010 Michael Kelly Award are:

• Ken Bensinger and Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times. Based on five months of tenacious reporting, Ken Bensinger and Ralph Vartabedian of the Los Angeles Times chronicled the problem of unintended acceleration in Toyotas. The two reporters methodically compiled a body of work that challenged Toyota’s explanation that the acceleration problems were caused by a glitch involving floor mats. Although their work was repeatedly disparaged by Toyota, it consistently was proven to be on target and helped prod the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to take actions it had resisted for years. As Los Angeles Times Editor Russell W. Stanton wrote in his nomination letter, Bensinger and Vartabedian “challenged assumptions, developed their own evidence and built a compelling case of corporate malfeasance and regulatory indulgence.”

• Sheri Fink, ProPublica Who should be saved first when disaster strikes? That’s the question that doctors and nurses at Memorial Medical Center in New Orleans faced in the harrowing days after Hurricane Katrina when scores of patients were trapped in a building without electricity or running water. In “The Deadly Choices at Memorial,” ProPublica writer and medical doctor Sheri Fink reconstructed the decisions that resulted in some patients being injected with lethal doses of morphine as others were boarded onto rescue helicopters. As a result of her two-year investigation, published in The New York Times Magazine, Fink informed the state and national debate over instituting medical guidelines on dealing with shortages of life-saving resources in the event of a disaster.

• Jeffrey Gettleman, The New York Times. As the East Africa correspondent for The New York Times, Jeffrey Gettleman has tracked the spread of Islamic radicalism, interviewed pirate bosses in Somalia (one of whom laughed that their lunch together was like “the cat eating with the mice”) and described how mass rape of women and men has become a weapon of war in eastern Congo. He’s been shot at by insurgents and dealt with the constant risk that his reporting will put him in harm’s way. “The Gettleman method,” Jack Shafer wrote in Slate, “is to play it straight and direct, easy on the cynicism, and without a hint of any world weariness.”

• David Rohde, The New York Times. In a riveting five-part series in The New York Times, David Rohde described how he and two Afghan colleagues were kidnapped by the Taliban outside Kabul and held for seven months before he and one of his colleagues escaped on foot to a Pakistani military base. Rohde was initially reluctant to write about his experience, telling his editors, “I don’t want to make myself look like a hero. I am not a hero.” But he bravely used his captivity to illuminate the world about the minds of terrorists who repeatedly threatened to behead him and to provide insights into what Rohde termed a “Taliban mini-state” in the tribal areas of Pakistan.

Five judges comprised this year’s Michael Kelly Award selection panel:

Ken Armstrong, The Seattle Times
Siobhan Gorman, The Wall Street Journal
Charlie Green, National Journal
Kathy Kiely, USA Today
Cullen Murphy, Vanity Fair

For additional information, including full entries and past winners, please visit www.kellyaward.com.

Atlantic Media Company is a Washington, D.C.-based publishing company whose flagship properties include The Atlantic, National Journal, and Government Executive.

 

• • • • • • • • • • • •

KEN ARMSTRONG AND NICK PERRY WIN THE 2009 MICHAEL KELLY AWARD
WASHINGTON, D.C. – David Bradley, chairman of Atlantic Media Company, announced tonight that Seattle Times reporters Ken Armstrong and Nick Perry are this year’s recipients of the Michael Kelly Award for their series exposing the criminal histories of members of a Rose Bowl-winning University of Washington football team.

The $25,000 award is given annually to a journalist whose work exemplifies a quality that animated Michael Kelly’s own career: the fearless pursuit and expression of truth. Kelly, who was the editor of two Atlantic Media publications, The Atlantic and National Journal, was killed while covering the war in Iraq in 2003.

In a statement, the award judges said Armstrong and Perry displayed “the commitment to truth that will alienate readers, risk advertising accounts, and jeopardize a newspaper’s standing during already precarious times.” The panel also noted that their “Victory and Ruins” series “showed how it wasn’t only the athletic department and university administrators who looked the other way at the players’ run-ins with the law but also local police, prosecutors, judges, and influential alumni.”

The judges also recognized four journalists from three other organizations as finalists: Barry Bearak and Celia Dugger of The New York Times, Richard Behar of Fast Company and Peter Godwin of Vanity Fair.

The winners and finalists were honored at a dinner tonight in Washington at Atlantic Media Company headquarters. The finalists were selected from a total of 50 entries from journalists at U.S.-based newspapers and magazines. The award is for work published in 2008.

A panel of five journalists served as judges for this year’s award: Carl Cannon, a contributing editor for National Journal; Charles Green, editor of National Journal; Kelly Kennedy, a staff writer at Army Times and a Michael Kelly Award finalist last year; Cullen Murphy, editor-at-large for Vanity Fair; and freelance writer Loretta Tofani, last year’s winner of the Michael Kelly Award.

Murphy, former managing editor of The Atlantic, recused himself from deliberations and voting regarding the Vanity Fair entry.

To read this year’s entries, and for additional information about the Michael Kelly Award, visit www.kellyaward.com.
Atlantic Media Company is a Washington, D.C.-based publishing company whose flagship properties include The Atlantic, National Journal, and Government Executive.

 

• • • • • • • • • • • •

2009 MICHAEL KELLY AWARD FINALISTS ANNOUNCED
Atlantic Media Company Salutes Journalists for
“The Fearless Pursuit and Expression of Truth”
WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Atlantic Media Company today named journalists from Fast Company, The New York Times, The Seattle Times and Vanity Fair as the finalists for this year’s Michael Kelly Award.

The winner of the $25,000 prize will be named at an April 16 ceremony in Washington. The Michael Kelly Award was created by Atlantic Media Company Chairman David G. Bradley after Kelly’s death while covering the war in Iraq in 2003. Kelly had been editor of two Atlantic Media publications, The Atlantic and National Journal. The Michael Kelly Award is bestowed annually upon a journalist whose work exemplifies the fearless pursuit and expression of truth that animated Kelly’s own career.

The finalists were selected from a total of 50 entries from journalists at U.S.-based newspapers and magazines for work published in 2008. This year’s finalists are:

• Ken Armstrong and Nick Perry of The Seattle Times for a series exposing the criminal histories of players on the last University of Washington football team to win the Rose Bowl.

• Barry Bearak and Celia Dugger of The New York Times for coverage of the rigged presidential election in Zimbabwe.

• Richard Behar of Fast Company for an article on China’s growing appetite for mineral resources in Africa.

• Peter Godwin of Vanity Fair for coverage of Robert Mugabe’s reign of terror in Zimbabwe

Five judges comprised this year’s Michael Kelly Award selection panel: Carl Cannon, contributing editor, National Journal; Charles Green, editor, National Journal; Kelly Kennedy, staff writer, Army Times and a 2008 Michael Kelly Award finalist; Cullen Murphy, editor at large, Vanity Fair; and Loretta Tofani, a freelance writer and the 2008 winner of the Michael Kelly Award.

Past winners of the award include C.J. Chivers, Esquire; Sharon LaFraniere, The New York Times; Nicholas D. Kristof, The New York Times; and Anthony Shadid, The Washington Post.

For additional information about the Michael Kelly Award, please visit www.kellyaward.com.

Atlantic Media Company is a Washington, D.C.-based publishing company whose flagship properties include The Atlantic, National Journal, and Government Executive.

 

• • • • • • • • • • • •

LORETTA TOFANI WINS THE 2008 MICHAEL KELLY AWARD

Salt Lake Tribune Contributor Honored at Awards Ceremony in Washington

WASHINGTON, D.C. – David Bradley, chairman of Atlantic Media Company, announced Loretta Tofani as the 2008 recipient of the Michael Kelly Award at a ceremony Thursday night in Washington. She was honored for her series on unsafe working conditions in China written for The Salt Lake Tribune.

The $25,000 award, which celebrates its 5th Anniversary this year, is given annually to a journalist whose work exemplifies a quality that animated Michael Kelly’s own career: the fearless pursuit and expression of truth. Kelly, who was the editor of two Atlantic Media publications, The Atlantic and National Journal, was killed while covering the war in Iraq in 2003.

According to a statement from the award judges, Tofani’s four-part series “is a tribute to her persistence, resourcefulness, and moral courage.” After going into private business and seeing first-hand the working conditions in China, Tofani decided to return to journalism, but discovered that few news organizations were interested in her reporting. Only through her perseverance was she able to find a newspaper committed to collaborating with her on the series.

In addition to Tofani, the judges recognized as finalists journalists who wrote three other entries: Kelly Kennedy, a staff writer for Army Times, for her series on an Army battalion in Iraq; Joshua Kors, an investigative reporter for The Nation, for stories on the military denying medical benefits to soldiers returning from Iraq; and Blake Morrison, Peter Eisler, and Tom Vanden Brook for articles in USA Today, on the Pentagon’s response to the threat of roadside bombs in Iraq. The finalists received $3,000 for their entry.

Atlantic Media received a total of 52 entries from reporters and editors at newspapers and magazines from across the country. The award is for work published in 2007.

Five judges comprised this year’s Michael Kelly Award selection panel: Peter Beinart, senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations; Nick Gillespie, editor of Reason.tv and Reason.com; Charles Green, editor of National Journal; Ruth Marcus, editorial writer and columnist of The Washington Post; and Cullen Murphy, editor-at-large of Vanity Fair.
Atlantic Media Company is a Washington, D.C.-based publishing company whose flagship properties include The Atlantic, National Journal, and Government Executive.

• • • • • • • • • • • •

2008 MICHAEL KELLY AWARD FINALISTS ANNOUNCED

Atlantic Media Company Salutes Four Journalists for
“The Fearless Pursuit and Expression of Truth”

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, the Atlantic Media Company named journalists from Army Times, The Nation, Salt Lake Tribune, and USA Today as the four finalists for this year’s installment of the company’s Michael Kelly Award.

The winner of the $25,000 prize will be named at a May 8 ceremony in Washington, D.C. The Michael Kelly Award was created by Atlantic Media Company Chairman David G. Bradley after Kelly’s death while covering the war in Iraq in 2003. Kelly had been editor of two Atlantic Media publications, The Atlantic and National Journal.

The Michael Kelly Award is bestowed annually upon a journalist whose work exemplifies the fearless pursuit and expression of truth that animated Kelly’s own career.

The finalists were selected from a total of 52 entries from journalists at U.S.-based newspapers and magazines for work published in 2007. This year’s finalists are:
• Kelly Kennedy, Army Times – for a series on an infantry regiment in Iraq hit hard by casualties.
• Joshua Kors, The Nation – for stories on the misdiagnosis of injured soldiers returning from Iraq.
• Blake Morrison, Peter Eisler, and Tom Vanden Brook, USA Today – for stories on the Pentagon’s failure to respond to the problem of roadside bombs in Iraq.
• Loretta Tofani, Salt Lake Tribune – for a series on unsafe working conditions in China.

Five judges comprised this year’s Michael Kelly Award selection panel: Peter Beinart, senior fellow, the Council on Foreign Relations; Nick Gillespie, editor of reason.tv and reason.com; Charles Green, editor, National Journal; Ruth Marcus, editorial writer and columnist, The Washington Post; and Cullen Murphy, editor-at-large, Vanity Fair.
Past winners of the award include C.J. Chivers, Esquire; Sharon LaFraniere, The New York Times; Nicholas D. Kristof, The New York Times; and Anthony Shadid, The Washington Post.

For additional information about the Michael Kelly Award, please visit www.kellyaward.com. Atlantic Media Company is a Washington, D.C.-based publishing company whose flagship properties include The Atlantic, National Journal, and Government Executive.

• • • • • • • • • • • •

C.J. CHIVERS WINNER OF THE 2007 MICHAEL KELLY AWARD

WASHINGTON, D.C. – David Bradley, chairman of Atlantic Media Company, announced tonight that C.J. Chivers is this year’s recipient of the Michael Kelly Award. He won for a reconstruction of the 2004 Beslan school siege written for Esquire.

The $25,000 award is given annually to a journalist whose work exemplifies a quality that animated Michael Kelly’s own career: the fearless pursuit and expression of truth. Kelly, who was the editor of two Atlantic Media publications, The Atlantic and National Journal, was killed while covering the war in Iraq in 2003.

According to a statement from the award judges, “Chivers produced an extraordinary hour-by-hour account of the school siege that is impossible to put down. Through careful, persistent reporting, Chivers provided Esquire readers with a haunting look at how innocent hostages, Chechen terrorists, and Russian authorities responded to a crisis that left 362 dead.”

In addition to Chivers, the judges recognized journalists from four publications as finalists: Rukmini Maria Callimachi, an Associated Press correspondent; Jesse Hamilton, a reporter for The Hartford Courant; William Langewiesche, international correspondent for Vanity Fair; and Charles Forelle, James Bandler, Mark Maremont, and Steve Stecklow, reporters with The Wall Street Journal. The journalists were honored at a dinner tonight in Washington.

The finalists were selected from a total of 57 entries from journalists at U.S.-based newspapers and magazines. The award is for work published in 2006.
A panel of five journalists served as judges for this year’s award: Peter Canellos, Washington bureau chief, The Boston Globe; David Grann, staff writer, The New Yorker; Charles Green, editor, National Journal; Cullen Murphy; editor at large, Vanity Fair; and Margaret Talbot, staff writer, The New Yorker. Murphy, former managing editor of the Atlantic, recused himself from deliberations and voting regarding the Vanity Fair entry.

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