The Michael Kelly Award

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Finalists From 2004-2017

2017 FINALISTS

Hannah Dreier

The Associated Press

CITATIONHannah Dreier_Headshot

As the AP’s Venezuela correspondent, Hannah Dreier has had the responsibility of reporting on the startling deterioration of a nation beset by government mismanagement and falling oil prices. She has done so with gripping accounts of the struggles of ordinary Venezuelans to survive. To depict the nation’s failing medical system, she showed how one girl’s scraped knee became a life-or-death ordeal. To show how the average Venezuelan spends 35 hours a month in food lines, Dreier waited in lines with them. She described how no one would help a woman who fainted in their midst because they did not want to lose their place in line. Wrote a Foreign Policy editor after reading one of Dreier’s pieces: “My God, Hannah Dreier has laid bare Venezuela’s nightmare.”

BIOGRAPHY

Hannah Dreier is Venezuela correspondent for The Associated Press. She moved to Caracas in 2014 amid a bloody nationwide protest movement, and has told the story of the country’s unraveling from inside prisons, hospitals and factories. She joined AP as a politics reporter in the Sacramento bureau and later covered gambling from Las Vegas. Before coming to AP, Dreier was a metro reporter at The Mercury News in San Jose. Her reporting has been recognized by the Livingston Awards, Society of Professional Journalists, and National Headliner Awards. Her 2016 “Venezuela Undone” series won the Overseas Press Club Hal Boyle Award. Dreier grew up in San Francisco and graduated from Wesleyan University.

Articles by Hannah Dreier

 

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David Fahrenthold

The Washington Post

CITATIONWashington Post staff portraits in Washington, DC.

Among the hundreds of reporters who wrote about Donald Trump last year, David Fahrenthold of The Washington Post stood out for the resourcefulness of his reporting, the originality of his work, and his commitment to the truth. Fahrenthold laid bare Trump’s false claims about his charitable giving and exposed the hypocrisy of Trump’s charitable foundation, forcing Trump to eventually shut it down. Ironically, like Trump, Fahrenthold recognized the importance of social media as a communications tool and was in the forefront of using it to dig up information. Fahrenthold’s unflinching coverage of Trump during one of the most tumultuous presidential campaigns in modern times served as a reminder that a diligent news media, far from being the enemy of the people, is essential to the health of a democracy.

BIOGRAPHY

David Fahrenthold has been a Washington Post reporter since 2000. During that time, he has covered the Washington D.C. police department, the environment, New England, and – since 2010 – U.S. politics. In 2016, Fahrenthold wrote a series of stories about Donald Trump’s questionable use of his personal foundation and Trump’s history of unfulfilled promises to donate money to charity. Fahrenthold also revealed the existence of a 2005 Access Hollywood video in which Trump bragged about groping women without their permission. A native of Houston and a 2000 graduate of Harvard University, Fahrenthold lives in Washington with his wife and two daughters.

Article by David Fahrenthold

Article by David Fahrenthold

Article by David Fahrenthold

Article by David Fahrenthold

Article by David Fahrenthold

Article by David Fahrenthold

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Selam Gebrekidan, Stephen Grey, and Amina Ismail

Reuters

CITATION

In “The Migration Machine,” Reuters correspondents Selam Gebrekidan, Stephen Grey and Amina Ismail expose the smuggling networks that profit from the transport of refugees from Africa and the Middle East to Europe. In three riveting stories about migrants from Eritea, Gebrekidan documents their journeys, the role of ISIS in capturing migrants and turning them into sex slaves, and the indifference of government authorities to their plight. After months of tracking down survivors from the most deadly sea disaster in the Mediterranean in 2016, Grey and Ismail showed how smugglers deliberately let migrants drown by their capsized ship rather than allow them aboard their rescue boat. While they plucked fellow smugglers from the water, some 500 migrants perished.

BIOGRAPHYSelam

Selam Gebrekidan is a reporter on the Reuters data and enterprise team. Born in Ethiopia, she moved to the United States in 2009 to study at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism. Over the past 18 months, she has reported from 10 countries in three continents to uncover how smuggling networks and the Islamic State profited from the global migration crisis.

 

 

 

 

Stephen GreyStephen Grey is a British journalist based in London. A former foreign correspondent and investigations editor of the Sunday Times of London, he has worked as an investigative journalist for Reuters for the past five years. He worked extensively in Iraq and Afghanistan and is best known for his revelations about CIA renditions.

 

 

 

 

AminaAmina Ismail joined Reuters Egypt bureau in 2015 after completing her master’s degree in journalism at Northwestern University. She previously worked in the Cairo bureau of McClatchy, has written for The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times, and worked as a freelancer.

 

 

 

Articles by Reuters reporters

 

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2016 FINALISTS

Martha Mendoza, Margie Mason, Robin McDowell, and Esther Htusan

The Associated Press

CITATION

As a result of a series of reports by the Associated Press on the seafood industry in southeast Asia, more than 2,000 slaves are free, a dozen people have been jailed, and ships worth millions of dollars have been seized. AP reporters Martha Mendoza, Margie Mason, Robin McDowell, and Esther Htusan diligently and deftly debunked claims by the seafood industry that slavery was a problem of the past by discovering hundreds of Burmese slaves, some of them caged, in a remote Indonesian island village. At great personal risk, they tracked the seafood caught by slaves to supply chains serving Wal-Mart, Target, Whole Foods and other retailers. Their reporting serves as a model for courage, determination, and ingenuity.

BIOGRAPHYmartha mendoza headshot

Martha Mendoza is an Associated Press national writer whose reports have won numerous awards and prompted congressional hearings, Pentagon investigations and White House responses. She won a 2000 Pulitzer Prize and George Polk Award for investigative reporting as part of a team that revealed the decades-old secret of how American soldiers early in the Korean War killed hundreds of civilians at the No Gun Ri bridge. Mendoza is the recipient of numerous other state, regional, national, and international journalism awards. She has reported for the AP in Albuquerque, N.M., New York, and Mexico City. She was a Knight Fellow at Stanford University, a Ferris Professor for Humanities at Princeton University, and in 2013 she was named a Champion of Freedom by the Electronic Privacy Information Center. She lives in Santa Cruz, California.

 

margie mason headshot

Margie Mason, an AP reporter based in Asia for more than a decade, specializes in medical writing, including coverage of SARS and bird flu. Her stories bring focus and attention to the grinding poverty and human rights abuses in the region. Mason joined the AP in 1997 in Charleston, West Virginia and was later based in San Francisco and Vietnam before her current posting in Indonesia. She has reported from more than 20 countries on four continents and co-authored an award-winning series on global drug resistance. She was a Nieman Global Health fellow at Harvard University and an Asian studies fellow at the University of Hawaii. She has a journalism degree from West Virginia University.

 

 

robin mcdowell headshot

Robin McDowell is an AP reporter who spent two decades covering Asia. Her reports from Cambodia and Myanmar highlighted the difficulties young democracies face after emerging from military rule, civil strife, and horrific rights abuses. And in Indonesia, where men were trapped for years, sometimes decades, she oversaw a busy bureau as it responded to everything from earthquakes and tsunamis to terrorist attacks. She also helped launch the AP’s first regional desk in Bangkok. McDowell went to Washington University in St. Louis and, after a few years in book publishing, to Columbia Graduate School of Journalism. She is currently based in Minneapolis.

 

 

 

ESTHER HEADSHOT

Since joining The Associated Press two years ago, Esther Htusan has relentlessly pursued stories about human rights abuses in Myanmar following a half-century of dictatorship. Her interest in covering Rohingya Muslims was almost unheard of in a country where much of the population _ including local journalists _ looked upon members of the long-persecuted minority with disdain. When Htusan joined the investigation into forced labor in Southeast Asia’s fishing industry, her compassion and resourcefulness in reporting led to some of the most powerful images the world has seen about modern day slavery: Men in a cage on a remote Indonesian island and interviews with men calling out over the side of their trawler. Some spoke of abuses at the hands of their captains and others begged The AP to tell families back home they were still alive.

Articles by AP reporters

 

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Ian Urbina

The New York Times

CITATIONUrbina

In The New York Times series “Outlaw Ocean,” Ian Urbina took readers on an eye-opening journey on the high seas, chronicling how the rule of law too often does not apply to international waters. Reporting from five seas and 14 countries, Urbina revealed that little is done about the thousands of seafarers, fishermen, and migrants who die at sea under suspicious circumstances each year or the unscrupulous shipping firms that intentionally dump enough oil into the oceans to rival the Deepwater Horizon and Exxon Valdez spills. Urbina’s series was brilliantly conceived and expertly told. “This is why we need newspapers,” one reader wrote. Added The Wall Street Journal: “incredible, readable, riveting series.”

BIOGRAPHY

Ian Urbina has been an investigative correspondent for The New York Times since 2010. Previously, he was the national desk’s mid-Atlantic bureau chief and a reporter for the Metro desk. Urbina was a member of the team of reporters that broke the story about then-New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer and his use of prostitutes, a series for which the Times won a Pulitzer in 2009. His 2015 series, The Outlaw Ocean, won a George Polk Award in foreign reporting. Several of Urbina’s investigative pieces have been adapted to film. His series called “Drilling Down” about hydraulic fracturing was the impetus the 2012 Matt Damon film “Promised Land.”  Urbina has degrees from Georgetown University and the University of Chicago. He lives in Washington, D.C., with his family.

Article by Ian Urbina

Article by Ian Urbina

Article by Ian Urbina

Article by Ian Urbina

Article by Ian Urbina

 


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James Verini

The Atavist Magazine

CITATION

In “The Doctor,” James Verini tells the story of an American physician who treats the sick and the wounded in a remote, war-torn region in the south of Sudan. The doctor, a man named Tom Catena, is the only physician at Mother of Mercy hospital. Catena is a complex man, both deeply religious and deeply cynical, shaped and scarred by the constant carnage around him as the government of Sudan bombs the people who live in the Nuba Mountains. Verini’s acute powers of observation and elegant prose provide readers of The Atavist a memorable look at Catena’s extraordinary life—and the lives of the Sudanese people who travel for hours to Mother of Mercy in hopes of being healed.

BIOGRAPHY

James Verini is a journalist based in Africa. In addition to The Atavist Magazine, he has written for The New Yorker, National Geographic, The New York Times Magazine and other publications. In 2015, he was the recipient of the National Magazine Award for feature writing, for an article in The Atavist Magazine about Afghanistan; and the George Polk Award for magazine reporting, for an article in National Geographic about Congo. Until 2009, he was a contributing editor at the Condé Nast Portfolio magazine. Before that, he was a features contributor and columnist at the Los Angeles Times covering culture and the arts, and before that a staff writer at the New York Observer, covering business.  He is 39.

Article by James Verini

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2015 FINALISTS

Matthieu Aikins

Matter

CITATIONMatthieu Aikins_headshot

Even in the grimmest of circumstances, the human spirit can shine through, as Matthieu Aikins chronicled in his riveting account of a civil defense team in war-torn Aleppo, Syria. Amid relentless aerial bombardment, the young men of the rescue squad tended to injured neighbors with courage, compassion, and humor. At great risk to himself, Aikins spent eight days embedded with the men to tell their story—and the larger story of one of the world’s most dangerous conflicts. After a bomb exploded next to the team’s station house, Aikins described the experience with characteristic grace. “To be hit by an explosion at close range is to experience light and sound as darkness and silence,” he wrote. “Silence as your ears ring louder than any sound, darkness as dust and smoke envelop you.”

BIOGRAPHY

Freelance writer Matthieu Aikins is the Schell Fellow at the Nation Institute. He lives in Kabul and has been reporting from Afghanistan since 2008. His feature writing and photography have appeared in such publications as Harper’s Magazine, Rolling Stone, the Atlantic, GQ, and Newsweek. Aikins received the 2013 Polk Award for magazine reporting, the Medill Medal for Courage, and the Kurt Schork Award for his Rolling Stone article “The A-Team Killings,” which uncovered evidence of war crimes in Afghanistan. He was a finalist for the 2014 Michael Kelly Award for the same article. Aikins recently completed a master’s degree in Near Eastern Studies at New York University. His academic interests include the geopolitics of South and Central Asia, and the future of journalism and new media.

Article by Matthieu Aikins

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Alex Campbell

BuzzFeed

CITATIONAlex Campbell_headshot

In an eye-opening series on domestic abuse, Alex Campbell revealed that battered women across the country are being imprisoned—sometimes for ten years or more—even though they never laid a hand on their children. Campbell found that the women were convicted under seemingly well-intentioned state laws that require them to remove their children from abusive situations. In many cases, however, the women themselves were being abused and feared for their safety—and their children’s—if they tried to leave. Some of the women were actually sentenced to longer jail time than the men who harmed their children. In reporting the series, Campbell scoured thousands of court dockets, reviewed hundreds of court files, and interviewed dozens of battered women, judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, and witnesses. Said Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand after reading Campbell’s first story, “It will make your blood boil.”

BIOGRAPHY

Alex Campbell is an investigative reporter for BuzzFeed News. Since he joined BuzzFeed in 2014, he has written about how battered women can be treated as criminals, and, with reporter Andrew Kaczynski, about how New York City allowed a con artist to clean up Ebola. He has also reported from Washington, Chicago, and Johannesburg, South Africa, and was previously an investigative reporter at The Indianapolis Star. Campbell, 26, is based in New York City.

Articles by Alex Campbell

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Dexter Filkins

The New Yorker

CITATIONDexter Filkins_headshot1

Dexter Filkins writes about Iraq with the authority of a tour guide who introduces you to a city by taking you where no other tour guide knows to go. Few journalists can match his grasp of strategic issues, his eye for detail, and his ability to weave a narrative that combines both. In his first piece on Iraq, Filkins tells the story of the fight against ISIS through the experience of the Kurds battling them as a way to gain their own independence. In the second article, Filkins explores the reasons behind the escalating violence in Iraq by profiling enigmatic then-prime minister Nuri al-Maliki. Informed by a decade of reporting in the region, the pieces show why Filkins has become one of the most respected reporters of his generation.

BIOGRAPHY

Dexter Filkins joined The New Yorker as a staff writer in 2011. He has written about Afghanistan, Iraq, Lebanon, Pakistan, Syria, and Yemen. Filkins worked at the Miami Herald and the Los Angeles Times, where he was the paper’s New Delhi bureau chief, before joining The New York Times in 2000, reporting from New York, South Asia, and Iraq. In 2009, he won a Pulitzer Prize as part of a team of Times journalists covering Pakistan and Afghanistan. He was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University and fellow at the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. He has received numerous prizes, including two George Polk Awards and three Overseas Press Club Awards. His book, The Forever War, won the 2008 National Book Critics Circle Award for nonfiction.

Article by Dexter Filkins

Article by Dexter Filkins

 

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2014 FINALISTS

Matthieu Aikins

Rolling Stone

CITATIONMatthieu Aikins_headshot

Working independently as a freelancer for Rolling Stone, Matthieu Aikins spent five months investigating allegations that a 12-member U.S. Special Forces Army unit known as an A-Team had engaged in unlawful killings of civilians while on patrol in Afghanistan. Reporting in a particularly dangerous region of Afghanistan, Aikins displayed both physical and moral courage in meticulously examining the allegations, going so far as to create a photo grid of A-Team members mixed with random images of American Special Forces soldiers that he presented to eyewitnesses. As a result of his reporting, groups such as Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International, and the U.N.’s Special Rapporteur on Extrajudicial Executions have publicly called for an investigation into the killings. A U.S. Army investigation is ongoing.

BIOGRAPHY

Matthieu Aikins has been reporting from Afghanistan since 2008. His feature writing and photography have appeared in such publications as Harper’s, Rolling Stone, GQ, Newsweek, and Wired. He is a frequent guest commentator on MSNBC, the BBC, the CBC, and National Public Radio. Aikins received the 2013 Polk Award for magazine reporting for his Rolling Stone article “The A-Team Killings.” He was a finalist for the National Magazine Award in the Reporting category for his 2011 article in the Atlantic on a massacre by Afghan security forces. In 2010, he won a National Magazine Award in Canada for “Best New Creative Talent.” Aikins, 29, recently completed a master’s degree in Near Eastern Studies at New York University. He currently divides his time between Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Article by Matthieu Aikins

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Dave Philipps

Colorado Springs Gazette

CITATIONDave Philipps_headshot

In a series entitled “Other Than Honorable,” Colorado Spring Gazette reporter Dave Philipps showed how the military was discharging physically and psychologically scarred soldiers rather than provide them with the medical treatment they desperately needed. Phillips documented how other-than-honorable discharges had surged more than 67 percent since 2009; in many of the cases, troops suffered from traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder. The number of soldiers receiving other-than-honorable discharges immediately started to drop after his reporting. Philipps also disclosed how the Air Force Academy was secretly using cadets as informants on fellow students. Against the backdrop of large staff reductions and multiple ownership changes at the Gazette, Philipps’s coverage was notable for its ambition, determination, and integrity.

BIOGRAPHY

Dave Philipps has worked at The Gazette for ten years as an investigative reporter, photographer, ski writer, restaurant critic, and occasional cartoonist. Because Colorado Springs is home to more than 50,000 active duty troops, his work has often focused on the military. A Colorado Springs native, Philipps graduated from Middlebury College in 2000 and received a master’s degree in journalism from Columbia University. In 2010, he won the Livingston Award for National Reporting and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Local Reporting for what judges called “his painstaking stories on the spike in violence within a battered combat brigade returning to Fort Carson after bloody deployments to Iraq.” He lives in at the foot of the Rockies with his wife and two sons.

Articles by Dave Philipps

Article by Dave Philipps

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Megan Twohey

Reuters

CITATIONposes for a portrait , at Reuters headquarters, in New York

Megan Twohey illuminated a problem that had long been in the shadows: U.S. parents adopting children from overseas, then sending them to live with strangers they met online because they no longer wanted to care for them. Before Twohey’s series, no government agency was involved in the transfers and none was investigating the practice, even though the children would sometimes end up in the homes of child abusers and pedophiles. Based on 18 months of reporting for Reuters, Twohey documented how children were being offered to strangers on average once a week. After reading the series, officials removed a boy and a girl from the care of a couple who became a focus of her investigation.

BIOGRAPHY

Megan Twohey is an investigative reporter at Thomson Reuters, where she has worked since January of 2012. In partnership with NBC News, her series on “private re-homing” in America was featured on multiple segments on NBC’s Today Show and Nightly News. It also won an award from the Sidney Hillman Foundation. Twohey previously worked at several news organizations, including the Chicago Tribune, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, The Moscow Times, and National Journal. Her work at the Tribune – exposing untested rape kits, predatory doctors and other flaws in the health care system –led to criminal convictions, new state laws and other reforms in Illinois. Twohey is a 1998 graduate of Georgetown University. Her interests include the outdoors, music, and travel.

Articles by Megan Twohey

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2013 FINALISTS

Alberto Arce

Associated Press

CITATIONAlberto Arce

Plagued by the highest murder rate in the world and overrun by drug traffickers, Honduras has become a cauldron of violence and political instability. More than two dozen Honduran journalists have been killed in just the last two years. Why did veteran war correspondent Alberto Arce move to Honduras in March of 2012? To “bear witness,” he said, “to a country in crisis.” Arce was the only foreign journalist stationed in Honduras last year. He wrote about coffins becoming political swag in one of the hemisphere’s poorest nations and chronicled life inside a prison so dangerous that not even prison guards are allowed in certain sections. His courage, dedication, and tenacity brought a dying country to life for readers around the world.

BIOGRAPHY

Alberto Arce joined the AP in February 2012 as a correspondent in Honduras. He previously wrote investigative narratives for Guatemala’s Plaza Pública and covered conflicts in Libya, Iraq, Afghanistan, and Palestinian territories as a freelance cameraman and writer for Spanish and international media. He has been recognized for his work in conflict zones, including a 2009 Anna Lindh award for reports from the Gaza Strip and a 2012 Rory Peck award for his coverage of the battle of Misrata in Libya. Arce grew up in northern Spain and has degrees from the University of Santiago de Compostela in Spain and the Latin American Faculty for Social Sciences in Buenos Aires. He lives in Tegucigalpa with his spouse and 2-year-old daughter.

Articles by Alberto Arce

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David Barboza

The New York Times

CITATIONDavid Barboza

In a series of reports that caused a sensation in China, David Barboza revealed that members of the family of then-Prime Minister Wen Jiabao were secret billionaires, using Wen’s position to acquire lucrative stakes in jewelry, finance, insurance, and communications companies. Barboza spent more than a year uncovering the finances of Wen’s family and in the process exposed the corruption riddling China’s political system. Barboza and The New York Times persevered at great risk. Barboza received threats and had to be relocated for a time to Japan. The Times saw its new Chinese-language Web site blocked by China and became the victim of sustained cyberattacks traced to the People’s Liberation Army.

BIOGRAPHY

David Barboza has been a correspondent for The New York Times based in Shanghai since November 2004 and writes primarily for the Business section. Barboza was a freelance writer and a research assistant for The New York Times before being hired in 1997 as a staff writer. For five years, he was the Midwest business correspondent based in Chicago. Since 2008, he has served as the paper’s Shanghai bureau chief. Barboza has twice won the Gerald Loeb Award for business reporting and has won two awards from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers. Barboza graduated from Boston University and attended Yale University Graduate School. He lives in Shanghai with his wife, Lynn Zhang.

Articles by David Barboza

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Michael M. Phillips
The Wall Street Journal

CITATIONMichael Phillips

After a suicide bomber slammed a pushcart filled with explosives into the convoy in which he was riding, Michael M. Phillips headed towards the stricken truck and helped drag a wounded sergeant out of the street as bullets from insurgents skipped off the road around them. With his dispatch about the attack, Phillips captured the bravery and tragedy in the confusion of war in Afghanistan. As importantly, he captured the often anguishing aftermath of the war in a series of reports he wrote upon returning to the United States. He described the altered emotional and mental states of America’s fighting men and women, telling the stories of what battle wreaks on veterans and the circle of people around them.

BIOGRAPHY

Michael Phillips is a staff reporter in the Washington bureau of The Wall Street Journal. He has covered the U.S. ground war in Afghanistan since 2001, embedding with American forces in the field on two dozen occasions. He previously worked for United Press International, States News Service, the Associated Press, and Dow Jones. Phillips was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for his feature coverage of the war in Afghanistan and he has won awards from the Scripps Howard Foundation, the National Press Club, the Society of Professional Journalists, and the National Association of Black Journalists. Born in Minneapolis, Phillips holds degrees from Harvard College and Princeton University. He is married to Julia Bucknall, and they have two children, Tashi and Alice Maud.

Article by Michael M. Phillips

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2012 FINALISTS

Rukmini Callimachi
Associated Press

CITATIONrukmini
Rukmini Callimachi’s relentless reporting has provided readers around the world with gripping accounts of violence in West Africa, where she serves as bureau chief for the Associated Press. Determined to verify rumors of a massacre by soldiers loyal to the newly inaugurated president of the Ivory Coast, Callimachi convinced survivors to take her on a long trek through a jungle to the site of the mass murders. She reported that as many as 47 people had died. She displayed the same fearlessness in her reporting on al-Qaida’s growing influence in West Africa, venturi ng deep into dangerous territory in Mali to interview villagers in contact with the terrorist organization. Her coverage exemplifies the very best in foreign reporting.

BIOGRAPHY
Rukmini Callimachi oversees two dozen countries in West Africa from AP’s bureau in Dakar, Senegal. Callimachi began her journalism career in 2001 as a freelance reporter in New Delhi, India. She joined the AP in Portland, Ore. in 2003. When Hurricane Katrina flooded New Orleans in 2005, she relocated to Louisiana and spent a year chronicling the aftermath of the storm. She was a finalist for the 2007 Michael Kelly Award for her coverage. Callimachi was a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize in International Reporting in 2009. She received an undergraduate degree in English literature from Dartmouth College and a master’s degree in linguistics from Exeter College, University of Oxford. A native of Bucharest, she speaks English, French and Romanian.

Articles by Rukmini Callimachi

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Kathy Dobie
Harper’s Magazine

CITATIONdobie1
After spending months winning their trust, Kathy Dobie convinced women on the Standing Rock reservation straddling North and South Dakota to tell her their stories. They re counted the sexual abuse they had suffered on the reservation and the indifference and intimidation they faced from the police, the courts, and other government authorities. Supported by The Investig ative Fund at The Nation Institute, Dobie wrote an article for Harper’s Magazine that vividly portrays the consequences of an atmosphere of social stigma, inadequate policing, and a broken legal system – a system weakened by divisions between federal and tribal law. “Every citizen of Standing Rock was a teacher,” Dobie said later. “I just had to stick around and listen.”

BIOGRAPHY
Kathy Dobie writes for Harper’s, GQ, The Nation and O magazine. Her memoir, “The Only Girl in the Car” was published by Dial Press. She was a finalist for the National Magazine Awards for her GQ story on a Vietnam War veteran’s mental breakdown on the day the United States invaded Iraq. Dobie lives in Brooklyn, N.Y.

Article by Kathy Dobie

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A.M Sheehan, Matt Hongoltz-Hetling
Advertiser Democrat (Norway, Maine)hongoltzsheehan

CITATION
A.M. Sheehan and Matt Hongoltz-Hetling demonstrated that a news organization does not have to be big to have a big impact. Writing for a small weekly newspaper with a staff of three in rural western Maine, Sheehan and Hongoltz-Hetling exposed the deplorable state of government-subsidized housing in their community after a three-month investigation. Within four hours of publication, the state launched an official probe. Within 48 hours, landlords were being issued citations. Within weeks, the state began reinspecting all of its Section 8 properties statewide. The s ubject of threats for their work, Sheehan and Hongoltz-Hetling remained under increased police protection long after publication of their articles. Their work serves as testimony to the power of dete rmined local coverage.

BIOGRAPHY
Anne M. Sheehan is the editor of the Advertiser Democrat in Norway, Maine. She has served as a top editor at three weekly newspapers, editor of a trade magazine, and head of the drama department at Kings College, Taunton in England. Her work has been recognized by the New York Press Association, New England Newspaper & Press Association, Maine Press Association and the George Polk Award.

Matt Hongoltz-Hetling is the assistant editor at the Advertiser Democrat, Maine’s oldest newspaper. He co-founded the UIC Today, a daily college newspaper in Chicago. He has written for various weekly and regional publications in Maine and his work has been recognized by the Maine Press Association, the New England Newspaper and Press Association, and the George Polk Award. Hongoltz-Hetling is currently working on his first nonfiction book.

Articles by A.M. Sheehan, Matt Hongoltz-Hetling

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2011 FINALISTS

Emily Bazelon
Slate

CITATIONemilybazelon
In “What Really Happened to Phoebe Prince,” Emily Bazelon of Slate shows that the journalism establishment and the legal system both erred in ascribing the suicide of a 15-year-old girl in South Hadley, Mass. to bullying by her high school classmates. The notion of a clique of students driving a classmate to her death was a compelling narrative, but it wasn’t true. Bazelon’s reporting makes clear that prosecuting Prince’s classmates for what a troubled girl did to herself was an abuse of the law. Her meticulously reported account of Prince’s final months is a model of challenging conventional wisdom and grappling with a complicated situation in a thoughtful and well-rounded way.

BIOGRAPHY
Emily Bazelon, 40, is a senior editor at Slate and co-editor of DoubleX, Slate’s section for women. She is also a contributing writer at The New York Times Magazine and the Truman Capote Fellow for Creative Writing and Law at Yale Law School. Before joining Slate, Bazelon worked as an editor and writer at Legal Affairs magazine and as a law clerk on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 1st Circuit. She is working on a book for Random House called Sticks and Stones: The New Problem of Bullying and How to Solve It. She is a graduate of Yale College and Yale Law School.

http://www.slate.com/articles/life/bulle/features/2011/what_really_happened_to_phoebe_prince/the_untold_story_of_her_suicide_and_the_role_of_the_kids_who_have_been_criminally_charged_for_it.html

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John Bowe
Mother Jones

CITATIONJohnBowePhoto
A result of a two-year investigation, John Bowe’s “Bound for America” exposed practices that amounted to human trafficking by a U.S. firm that recruited Thai farmers for agricultural jobs in the United States and charged them $10,000 to $20,000 apiece –plus interest–for job placement. After arriving here, the farmers worked only sporadically and didn’t earn enough to even cover their loan payments. Five months after the publication of Bowe’s story, which was supported by The Investigative Fund at The Nation Institute, a federal grand jury indicted company officials for engaging in “a conspiracy to commit forced labor.” The offices of the company, Global Horizons, are now closed.

BIOGRAPHY
John Bowe, 46, is the author of several books, including Nobodies: Modern American Slave Labor and the Dark Side of the New Global Economy. He has contributed to The New Yorker, GQ, The American Prospect, Mother Jones, PRI’s This American Life, and is currently a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine. His other books include US: Americans Talk About Love, as editor, and Gig: Americans Talk About Their Jobs, as co-editor. He was also a co-screenwriter of the film Basquiat. His journalism has garnered several awards, including the J. Anthony Lukas Work-in-Progress Award, the Sydney Hillman Award, the Richard J. Margolis Award, and the Harry Chapin Media Award for coverage of hunger and poverty-related issues. He lives in Manhattan.

http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2010/05/immigration-law-indentured-servitude

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Jonathan M. KatzP1060443-1.JPG
Associated Press

CITATION
Jonathan M. Katz was the only foreign correspondent stationed in Haiti when a powerful earthquake hit on January 12, 2010. From that moment – when he borrowed a cell phone to call in the news even though his house had collapsed around him – Katz covered the earthquake and its aftermath with resourcefulness and determination. Over the course of the next year, his reporting on stalled recovery efforts triggered the resignation of a government official and his revelations linking a cholera outbreak to U.N. peacekeepers forced the United Nations to appoint an independent panel to investigate the matter. His coverage represents foreign correspondence at its best.

BIOGRAPHY
Jonathan M. Katz became The Associated Press correspondent in Haiti in 2007. While living in Port-au-Prince he survived and covered the January 12, 2010, earthquake, remaining in country for a third year to cover the stalled reconstruction, cholera epidemic, and political crisis that followed. Katz first reported for AP from Jerusalem as an intern during the Second Intifada. After graduating from Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism in 2004, Katz worked for Congressional Quarterly and then joined AP to cover Congress and the federal government. His awards include a first-place SPJ Deadline Club of New York award for beat coverage of Haiti’s pre-quake hunger crisis. Katz was born in Queens, N.Y., and grew up in Louisville, Ky.

 • • • • • • • • • • • •

2010 FINALISTS

Ken Bensinger, Ralph Vartabedian RalphVartabedian100KenBensinger100
Los Angeles Times

CITATION
Based on five months of tenacious reporting, Ken Bensinger and Ralph Vartabedian of the Los Angeles Times chronicled the problem of unintended acceleration in Toyotas. The two reporters methodically compiled a body of work that challenged Toyota’s explanation that the acceleration problems were caused by a glitch involving floor mats. Although their work was repeatedly disparaged by Toyota, it consistently was proven to be on target and helped prod the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to take actions it had resisted for years. As Los Angeles Times Editor Russell W. Stanton wrote in his nomination letter, Bensinger and Vartabedian “challenged assumptions, developed their own evidence and built a compelling case of corporate malfeasance and regulatory indulgence.”

BIOGRAPHY
Since 2007, Ken Bensinger has been a staff writer for the Los Angeles Times. As a business enterprise reporter, projects have included covering investigations, profiles, and news analysis among others for the business section. As an industry reporter, he covered US and import brands as well as the bankruptcies of GM and Chrysler, auto industry collapse and the electrification of transportation. Prior to his current post, Bensinger worked for SmartMoney magazine and was in charge of investigations as well as banking coverage. Before joining SmartMoney, Bensinger was a freelance journalist working as a correspondent for Variety, Christian Science Monitor and other publications in Mexico. He also spent time writing for The Wall Street Journal, covering the art market beat. He earned his degree from Duke University.

Ralph Vartabedian has spent nearly thirty years with the Los Angeles Times. He currently holds the position of National Correspondent but has also worked as a deputy business editor and staff writer, both in Orange County and at the Washington, DC bureau. Prior to joining the Los Angeles Times, he worked for the Minneapolis Star as a business writer and for the Kalamazoo Gazette. He won Associated Press News Executives Council Award for news writing for his 1997 piece, “Boeing to Acquire Douglas, Creating Aerospace Behemoth.” He has also won the Gerald Leoh Award for Business Writing and the Edward J. Meeman Award for Energy Reporting. He has also be honored by the Greater Los Angeles Press Club, by placing first for business news writing. He earned both his BA and MA degrees from the University of Michigan.


Auto safety agency labors to keep pace
Capitol Hill adds to angst for Toyota
Data point to Toyota’s throttles
Toyota halts sale of 8 models
Another massive Toyota recall
Runaway Toyota cases ignored
Toyota keeps tight lid on safety issues
Toyota’s woes may not end at floor mats

 • • • • • • • • • • • •

Sheri Fink
ProPublica

CITATIONSheriFink100
Who should be saved first when disaster strikes? That’s the question that doctors and nurses at Memorial Medical Center in New Orleans faced in the harrowing days after Hurricane Katrina when scores of patients were trapped in a building without electricity or running water. In “The Deadly Choices at Memorial,” ProPublica writer and medical doctor Sheri Fink reconstructed the decisions that resulted in some patients being injected with lethal doses of morphine as others were boarded onto rescue helicopters. As a result of her two-year investigation, published in The New York Times Magazine, Fink informed the state and national debate over instituting medical guidelines on dealing with shortages of life-saving resources in the event of a disaster.


BIOGRAPHY
Dr. Sheri Fink has reported on health, medicine and science in the U.S. and from every continent except Antarctica. She was a frequent contributor to the public radio newsmagazine PRI’s “The World,” covering the global HIV/AIDS pandemic and international aid in development, conflict and disaster settings. Her articles have appeared in such publications as The New York Times, Discover and Scientific American. Fink’s book, War Hospital: A True Story of Surgery and Survival (Public Affairs, 2003), won the American Medical Writer’s Association special book award and was a finalist for the Overseas Press Club and PEN Martha Albrand awards. Fink received her M.D. and Ph.D. from Stanford, and worked with humanitarian aid organizations in more than a half dozen emergencies in the U.S. and overseas. She has taught at Harvard, Tulane and the New School. Most recently Fink was the recipient of a Kaiser Media Fellowship in Health from the Kaiser Family Foundation and she is currently a Public Policy Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson Center.


The Deadly Choices at Memorial (cover)
In Flu Pandemic, Florida’s Hospitals May Exclude Certain Patients
Preparing for a Pandemic, State Health Departments Struggle With Rationing Decisions
Louisiana Doctors Drafting Guidelines on Access to Critical Care During a Disaster

 • • • • • • • • • • • •

Jeffrey Gettleman
The New York Times

CITATIONJeffreyGettleman100
As the East Africa correspondent for The New York Times, Jeffrey Gettleman has tracked the spread of Islamic radicalism, interviewed pirate bosses in Somalia (one of whom laughed that their lunch together was like “the cat eating with the mice”) and described how mass rape of women and men has become a weapon of war in eastern Congo. He’s been shot at by insurgents and dealt with the constant risk that his reporting will put him in harm’s way. “The Gettleman method,” Jack Shafer wrote in Slate, “is to play it straight and direct, easy on the cynicism, and without a hint of any world weariness.”


BIOGRAPHY
Jeffrey Gettleman was named chief of the Nairobi bureau of The New York Times in August 2006 after serving as a foreign correspondent there since July of the same year. Previously Gettleman was a reporter for the paper’s metro desk since 2004. He joined The New York Times as a domestic correspondent in the Atlanta bureau in August 2002. He was part of the paper’s Iraq team, covering the war from the invasion in 2003 and returning to Iraq for a total of five tours. Before joining the Times, Gettleman was Atlanta bureau chief for the Los Angeles Times since 2000, where he was also a war correspondent in Afghanistan and the Middle East. Before that he had been a general assignment reporter for that paper since 1999. From 1997 until 1998 he was a city hall and police reporter for the St. Petersburg Times. In 1994 Gettleman was a communications officer for Save the Children organization in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.  Gettleman has been the recipient of numerous awards, including an Overseas Press Club award in 2002 for reporting from Afghanistan. In 2001 he received the Los Angeles Times Editorial Award for Breaking News. He received first place for spot news from the Tampa Bay Society of Professional Journalists in 1997 and 1998. In 1997 the Florida Press Club awarded him first place for general reporting, and he was named Photographer of the Year (1994) by the Cornell Daily Sun.  Gettleman received a B.A. in philosophy from Cornell University (Ithaca, N.Y.) in May 1994. He was a Marshall Scholar at Oxford University, where he received a Master of Philosophy in June 1996. While at Oxford he was the first American editor of Cherwell, the university’s student newspaper. Gettleman was born on July 22, 1971. He is fluent in Swahili and conversant in Indonesian.


For Somali Pirates, Worst Enemy May Be Waiting Back on Shore

 • • • • • • • • • • • •

2009 FINALISTS

Barry Bearak, Ceclia Dugger
The New York Times

CITATIONcdugger xbarry01.jpg
Lawlessness reigned in Zimbabwe as the government of Robert Mugabe terrorized residents last year in a desperate, and ultimately successful, attempt to stay in power after disputed elections in March. New York Times reporters (and husband and wife) Barry Bearak and Celia Dugger chronicled Zimbabwe’s disintegration at great personal risk. Bearak was imprisoned by authorities in Zimbabwe for several days for the crime of “committing journalism.” As one of Bearak’s captors told him, “You’ve been gathering, processing and disseminating the news.” After Bearak’s release, he was spirited out of the country and unable to return because he was too well known. But Dugger decided to risk her own arrest and imprisonment by traveling to Zimbabwe to continuing reporting the story. Their dozens of gripping and first-hand accounts ensured that the government’s campaign of violence and intimidation did not go unnoticed.

BIOGRAPHY
Barry Bearak became co-bureau chief of the Johannesburg bureau of The New York Times in January 2008. Bearak joined The Times in 1997. He was the newspaper’s co-bureau chief in South Asia from 1998 until 2002. He then joined The Magazine as a staff writer. Before coming to The Times, Bearak worked for The Los Angeles Times as a roving national correspondent from 1982 until 1997. He was a reporter on the metro staff of The Miami Herald from 1976 until 1982.  Bearak was the co-recipient, along with his wife Celia Dugger, of the 2009 George Polk Foreign Reporting Award for coverage of the violence in Zimbabwe surrounding the disputed re-election of the authoritarian president. He won the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for international reporting for his work in Afghanistan and Pakistan. He won the 2001 George Polk Award for the same body of work. In 1987, Bearak was a Pulitzer finalist in the category of feature writing. He has won numerous other awards, including the Mike Berger Award for reporting about New York City, from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, and the James Aronson Award for Social Justice Journalism. Born in Chicago on Aug. 31, 1949, Bearak received an undergraduate degree from Knox College in Galesburg, Ill., and a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He lives in Pelham, N.Y., with his wife, Celia W. Dugger, and their two sons Max and Sam.

Celia W. Dugger became co-bureau chief of the Johannesburg bureau of The New York Times in January 2008. Previously, Dugger was a foreign correspondent, based in New York and assigned to cover global poverty issues. She was an Edward R. Murrow Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations from 2002 to 2003. Dugger was a co-chief of the New Delhi bureau from August 1998 to July 2002, after joining The Times as a metropolitan news reporter in March 1991.
Before that, she was a reporter for The Miami Herald from 1984 and was a reporter for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution from 1980 to 1984. She interned at The Washington Post in 1979 and 1980. Born in Austin, Tex., on July 3, 1958, Dugger received a B.A. degree in history, magna cum laude, from Harvard College in 1980. Dugger was the co-recipient, along with her husband Barry Bearak, of the 2009 George Polk Foreign Reporting Award for coverage of the violence in Zimbabwe surrounding the disputed re-election of the authoritarian president. In 2007 Dugger was the co-recipient, along with Donald McNeil, of an Overseas Press Club Award and the grand prize from the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Awards. They received both awards for their series “Diseases on the Brink,” which documented how tens of millions of the world’s poorest people continue to be subject to diseases that could be inexpensively cured or prevented. She also won the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for international reporting in 2005. She was awarded the Livingston Award for local reporting in 1992, and in 1983 she received the George Polk Award. Dugger is married to Barry Bearak, who was co-bureau chief with her in India and will now serve as co-bureau chief with her in Johannesburg. They have two children.


In Crisis, Zimbabwe Asks: Could Mugabe Lose?
In Zimbabwe Jail: A Reporter’s Ordeal
Zimbabwe’s Rulers Unleash Police on Anglicans
In a Crackdown, Zimbabwe Curbs Aid Groups
Assassins in Zimbabwe Aim at the Grass Roots

 • • • • • • • • • • • •

Richard Behar
Fast Company

CITATIONrbehar
In “China Storms Africa,” investigative reporter Richard Behar reveals China’s aggressive quest for natural resources in sub-Sahara Africa. “This commercial invasion,” Behar writes, “is without question the most important development in the sub-Sahara since the end of the Cold War.” It is, he reports, “one of the most bare-knuckled resource grabs the world has ever seen.” To report the story for Fast Company, Behar traveled throughout Africa to gather the evidence of China’s ambitions, which threaten to wipe out a decade’s worth of efforts to improve African human rights and government transparency. But in the end, Behar writes, it’s not just about China and Africa. “We buy China’s junk, they buy our bonds, our real estate, even our corporations; they expand into Africa with our money, enabling them to grow and sell us more junk. It’s a spiderweb, a matrix-and how it spins out is as scary as it is unclear.”

BIOGRAPHY
Business reporter Richard Behar has garnered more than 20 journalism awards over a career spanning 25 years. He was called “one of the most dogged of our watchdogs” by the late Jack Anderson – a founding father of modern investigative reporting. From 1982-2004, Behar worked on the staffs of Forbes, Time and Fortune magazines. He has also done assignments for BBC, CNN, Fast Company, FoxNews.com and PBS. In 2005, Behar launched Project Klebnikov, a global media alliance committed to shedding light on the Moscow murder of Forbes editor Paul Klebnikov and to furthering the investigative work that Paul began. In December of 2008, Behar was commissioned by Random House to write a book about the Bernard Madoff scandal. Major awards include the Daniel Pearl, Loeb, Polk, National Magazine, Overseas Press Club and Worth Bingham, among others – on subjects ranging from counterfeiting in Beijing to terror financing in Karachi; from organized crime in Siberia to corporate wrongdoing on Wall Street. Behar was included among the 100 top business journalists of the 20th century by The Journalist and Financial Reporter, and was named Business Journalist of the Year in London in 2001. He also received the rarely-bestowed Conscience-in-Media Award from the American Society of Journalists and Authors, for a Time cover story on the Church of Scientology. A graduate of New York University, Behar today serves on the advisory committee of the school’s business journalism masters program.

China Storms Africa
China Storms Africa Story Image

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Peter Godwin
Vanity Fair

CITATIONpgodwin
Peter Godwin saw Zimbabwe as few other journalists could. He grew up and was educated in Zimbabwe, served as a conscript, and maintains a network of friends and associates in the country. After President Robert Mugabe banned Western journalists from Zimbabwe, Godwin was able to spend more than six weeks there at a particularly horrific time, when Mugabe was terrorizing citizens in the run-up to elections. Godwin’s brave and moving piece in Vanity Fair describes a social collapse and brutal intimidation so extreme that people in Zimbabwe refer to the prevailing state of mind there simply as “the Fear.” But, as Godwin shows, the spirit of resistance has not been entirely extinguished. In one scene in his story, a church congregation crowds around Godwin when the police attempt to seize him, quietly hiding his notebooks under their clothing so that there will be no evidence that he is a journalist.

BIOGRAPHY
Peter Godwin, 51, grew up in Africa. He studied law at Cambridge university, and international relations at Oxford. He is an award winning foreign correspondent, author, documentary-maker and screenwriter. After practicing human rights law in Zimbabwe, he became a foreign and war correspondent, and has reported from over 60 countries, including wars in Angola, Mozambique, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Uganda, Somalia, Congo, Ivory Coast, Sudan, Bosnia, Kosovo, Kashmir and the last years of apartheid South Africa. He served as East European correspondent and Diplomatic correspondent for the London Sunday Times, and chief correspondent for BBC television’s flagship foreign affairs program, Assignment (now Correspondent), making documentaries from such places as Cuba, Panama, Indonesia, Pakistan, Spain, Northern Ireland, the Philippines, Czechoslovakia, Romania, Bulgaria, the Baltics, and the Balkans as it descended into war. His film, The Industry of Death, about the sex trade in Thailand, won the gold medal for investigative film at the New York Film Festival. He also wrote and co-presented a three part series ‘Africa Unmasked’ for Britain’s Channel Four. He has written for a wide array of magazines and newspapers including Vanity Fair, National Geographic, New York Times magazine, Time, and Newsweek, the Observer (London) and the Guardian (London.) He is the author of five non fiction books: ‘Rhodesians Never Die’ – The Impact of war and Political Change on White Rhodesia c.1970 – 1980 (with Ian Hancock), Wild at Heart: Man and Beast in Southern Africa (with photos by Chris Johns and foreword by Nelson Mandela), The Three of Us – a New Life in New York (with Joanna Coles) and Mukiwa, which he received the George Orwell prize and the Esquire-Apple-Waterstones award. His latest book is When a Crocodile Eats the Sun – a Memoir of Africa.
He has taught writing at the New School, Princeton and Sarah Lawrence College.

“Day of the Crocodile”

 • • • • • • • • • • • •

2008 FINALISTS

Kelly Kennedy
Army Times

CITATIONkennedy
Army Times medical writer Kelly Kennedy chronicled the 15-month tour of duty of an Army battalion that lost 31 soldiers in Iraq, making it the hardest-hit battalion since the Vietnam War. During those 15 months, one soldier threw himself on a grenade to save his friends, a well-liked first sergeant shot himself to death in front of his troops, and a platoon staged a mutiny by refusing to patrol an area they knew was mined because they feared they would lose control and vent their rage on civilians. The father of one soldier e-mailed Kelly to thank her for the four-part series, entitled “Blood Brothers.” “I had some idea about how hard life was there in Iraq,” the father wrote, “but you made it very personal. I could hardly read on as the tears fell from my eyes. I couldn’t see.”

BIOGRAPHY
Kelly Kennedy served in the United States Army from 1987 to 1993, including tours in the Middle East during Desert Storm, and in Mogadishu, Somalia. After earning her journalism degree at Colorado State University in 1997, she began her writing career as an education reporter for the Ogden Standard-Examiner in Utah, a criminal justice reporter at The Salt Lake Tribune and a family and education reporter with the Oregonian in Portland. While earning a master’s degree in journalism at the University of Colorado, Kennedy taught journalism classes at both her alma mater and the University of Northern Colorado. After completing her master’s degree, she worked an internship at The Chicago Tribune before arriving in 2005 at Army Times, where she remains today as a medical reporter.


Blood Brothers Part I
Blood Brothers Part II
Blood Brothers Part III
Blood Brothers Part IV

 • • • • • • • • • • • •

Joshua Kors
The Nation

CITATIONkors
In a two-part series in The Nation, Joshua Kors revealed how U.S. soldiers wounded in Iraq were being denied medical benefits when they returned home because they supposedly had pre-existing personality disorders before they joined the Army. Kors told the story through the experiences of Army Specialist Jon Town, who was knocked unconscious by a rocket in Iraq and suffered severe hearing loss and memory failure. After returning to the States for medical care, Town was diagnosed as having a pre-existing personality disorder, discharged, denied benefits, and ordered to refund the Army part of his signing bonus. Kors’s series caused the government to reverse its diagnosis of Town and sparked bipartisan action in Congress to address other cases like Town’s that Kors unearthed.

BIOGRAPHY
Joshua Kors is an investigative reporter for The Nation magazine, where he covers military and veterans’ issues. Kors’ reporting has earned him the George Polk Award and National Headliner Award, as well as qualification as a finalist for both the National Magazine Award and Harvard’s Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting. From 2004 to 2005 he worked at Northern California’s top-rated news station, KCBS-AM in San Francisco, while reporting on politics and education for Knight Ridder’s Contra Costa Times. Kors graduated magna cum laude from Amherst College and earned his master’s degree in 2003 from the Columbia School of Journalism in New York. In his spare time, Kors writes for a kids’ magazine, Current Science, and studies ballroom dancing.


Articles
www.joshuakors.com/part1.pdf
www.joshuakors.com/part2.pdf

 • • • • • • • • • • • •

Tom Vanden Brook, Peter Eisler, Blake Morrison
USA Today

CITATIONusa_reporters
Why did the military respond so ineffectively to the threat that roadside bombs in Iraq posed to U.S. troops? Why did the Pentagon balk at pleas from officers in the field for safer vehicles? USA Today reporters Tom Vanden Brook, Peter Eisler, and Blake Morrison pursued the answers to those questions in a series of stories called “Troops at Risk.” In the process they did more than chronicle failures-they sparked Pentagon action that almost certainly has saved lives. They wrote about a little-used armored vehicle dubbed MRAP and its ability to withstand roadside bombs more effectively than the widely used armored Humvees. Motivated by the USA Today story, Defense Secretary Robert Gates made buying the MRAP the military’s top acquisition priority.

BIOGRAPHY
Blake Morrison, as the deputy enterprise editor at USA Today, contributes original reporting and helps to direct projects and investigations for the nation’s largest newspaper. After six years as a reporter and editor at the St. Paul Pioneer Press, Morrison joined USA Today as a national reporter in 1999 and began covering aviation security after the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. He has taught reporting and writing courses at the University of Maryland and is the co-author of the memoir, How to Cook Your Daughter. He lives in Alexandria, Va.

Peter Eisler has been an investigative reporter at USA Today since 1995. He’s a two-time winner of the National Press Club’s Kozik Medal for environmental reporting, most recently for a series on the Pentagon’s efforts to avoid cleaning up pollution at military bases. Last year, he was a national finalist for the APME Public Service Award for stories on fire safety lapses in institutions that care for the elderly and disabled. Eisler is a graduate of Trinity College and currently lives in Washington, D.C. with his wife Mimi Hall, who is also a reporter at USA Today.

Tom Vanden Brook has covered the Pentagon for USA Today since April 2006. Before coming to USA Today in 2000, he was a reporter at The Milwaukee Journal and Milwaukee Journal Sentinel where his beats included local and state government, general assignment, higher education and the environment. He has a master’s degree in journalism and a bachelor’s degree in history from the University of Wisconsin. Vanden Brook lives with his wife, journalist Katherine Skiba, in Arlington, Va.


July 16th
October 17th
November 7th
December 17th
December 19th

 • • • • • • • • • • • •

2007 FINALISTS

Rukmini Callimachi
Associated Press

CITATIONCallimachi
Rukmini Maria Callimachi spent a year in New Orleans chronicling the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina for the Associated Press. Her articles artfully captured the challenges confronting a city struggling to reclaim its spirit. She wrote about a three-year-old child who rode out Katrina’s waves inside a cooler and is now terrified of taking baths. She wrote about the arrival of the new phonebook as a mark of how much things had changed. (The number of pages listing contractors had more than doubled from the year before, while the number of ‘Beauty Salon’ listings was down 42 percent.) And she wrote about how, amid all of the destruction and despair, the wedding business in New Orleans was booming. “It reminds me of Valentine’s Day,” a marriage license clerk told her. “Except it’s like Valentine’s Day all the time.”

BIOGRAPHY
Rukmini Callimachi began reporting out of Dakar, Senegal, as one of the West African correspondents for The Associated Press in late 2006. Before that, she spent a year in New Orleans documenting the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. She joined the AP in Portland, Ore., in 2003. Her reporting has won the Templeton Religion Story of the Year award and the Associated Press Managing Editors’ Charles Rowe Award. She began her career as a freelancer for Time magazine in New Delhi, India. Born in Bucharest, Romania, Callimachi graduated with honors from Dartmouth College and completed her masters in linguistics at Exeter College, Oxford. Her poetry has been published in more than 20 journals, including The American Scholar. In 2000, she co-led the Royal Geographical Society of London’s expedition to Tibet.


“The Children of the Storm”

“Katrina’s Unidentified Dead”

“New Orleans Convention Center Once Again a Last Resort, This Time for Medical Care”

“Phonebooks Highlight New Orleans Changes”

 • • • • • • • • • • • •

Jesse Hamilton
The Hartford Courant

CITATIONHC Jesse Hamilton.jpg
Over the course of a year, Jesse Hamilton reported on the experiences of the Marines of Charlie Company before, during, and after their tour of duty in Iraq. He trained with them in the Mojave Desert, joined them on patrols and house-to-house raids in Fallujah, and stood with them in Arlington as they buried one of their own. Through their stories, Hamilton told the story of war and warriors. In simple, direct, and compelling prose, he showed Hartford Courant readers what Iraq looked like, what it smelled like, and what it felt like for Marine reservists from Connecticut called upon to fight.

BIOGRAPHY
Jesse Hamilton has been writing about the military for The Hartford Courant since 2002. Before that, he worked at several newspapers in Washington state, winning a George Polk Award and an Investigative Reporters and Editors Award at the Yakima Herald-Republic for an investigation of the fighting of a forest fire that killed four wildland firefighters. He won the Society of Professional Journalists’ feature-writing award for his account of a true-life murder mystery in a small town. In his career, he’s also covered a tribal whale hunt, the fire that killed 100 in a Rhode Island nightclub, and three back-to-back hurricanes striking central Florida. Hamilton, 32, was born in Portland, Ore., and earned a B.A. degree from Western Washington University. He lives in Groton, Conn., with his wife, Audrey.


“Back from Fallujah, Looking for Normal”

“Interpreter Holds Power In The War of Words”

“Bursts of Beauty Amid Rubble”

“A Gruesome Past, An Explosive Future”

“Stoic In Devotion ‘Marines Don’t Cry”

 • • • • • • • • • • • •

William Langewiesche
Vanity Fair

CITATIONLangewiesche
Since the U.S. invasion in March of 2003, William Langewiesche has made 10 reporting trips to Iraq and chronicled its deterioration with clear-eyed precision. In perhaps his most ambitious reporting effort, Langewiesche carefully reconstructed the killing by U.S. Marines of 24 Iraqi civilians in the city of Haditha in November, 2005. In his hands, Haditha becomes not only a story about the Americans and Iraqis caught up in a tragic chain of events, but also a cautionary tale about the rules of engagement under which American forces operate in Iraq. Haditha, he wrote, “is what defeat looks like in this war.”

BIOGRAPHY
William Langewiesche assumed the newly created post of international correspondent for Vanity Fair in 2006. Prior to that, Langewiesche was a national correspondent at The Atlantic. During his tenure there, he was nominated for eight consecutive National Magazine Awards, and won in 2002 for reporting for his article “The Crash of EgyptAir 990.” Langewiesche is the author of numerous books, among them American Ground: Unbuilding the World Trade Center, an insider’s account of the cleanup of the Twin Towers, and The Outlaw Sea: A World of Freedom, Chaos, and Crime. His book The Atomic Bazaar: The Rise of the Nuclear Poor is due out this spring. Prior to joining The Atlantic, he had been a professional pilot. Langewiesche resides in California and France.


“Baghdad is Burning”

“Rules of Engagement”

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Charles Forelle, James Bandler, Mark Maremont, Steve Stecklow
The Wall Street Journal

CITATION   StecklowMaremontBandlerForelle
Reporters aren’t known for writing algorithms, but one that The Wall Street Journal‘s Charles Forelle devised helped trigger federal investigations of nearly 140 companies for massive and long-hidden fraud. Forelle, working with Journal colleagues James Bandler, Mark Maremont, and Steve Stecklow, used the statistical-modeling technique to find likely perpetrators of stock-options abuses. The Journal showed that options were often rigged, providing billions in extra pay for executives. In one case, the Journal determined that the odds of a chief executive’s stock-option grants always being dated just before a rise in the stock price were one in 300 billion. In another case, one in 200 million. As a result of the Journal‘s inquiry, at least 70 top business executive lost their jobs.

BIOGRAPHY
Charles Forelle is a reporter in The Wall Street Journal‘s Boston bureau. He joined the Journal as an intern in June 2002. Born in New York, Forelle received a bachelor’s degree in mathematics from Yale, where he was managing editor of the Yale Daily News from 2000 to 2001. He currently resides in Boston.

James Bandler is part of the Journal‘s special projects reporting team and is based in Boston. He joined the Journal in September 1999 as a health care and education writer. A graduate of Brown University, Bandler has also worked at the Rutland Herald, Barre Times Argus, and Boston Globe.

Mark Maremont is a special projects editor at the Journal, based in Boston. He joined the paper in May 1997. Maremont began his journalism career as a New York-based telecommunications editor at BusinessWeek. Maremont received a bachelor’s degree from Brown University and a master’s degree from Columbia University.

Steve Stecklow is a senior special writer and news editor in the Journal‘s Boston bureau. He previously worked in the Journal‘s London bureau as a global investigative reporter. He has also worked at the Atlantic City Press, Philadelphia Bulletin, Washington Star and Philadelphia Inquirer. Stecklow received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Pennsylvania.


“The Perfect Payday”

“Open Spigot”

“Matter of Timing”

“Executive Retreat”

“Executive Pay: The 9/11 Factor”

 • • • • • • • • • • • •

2006 FINALISTS

Kurt Eichenwald
The New York Times

CITATIONKurt Eichenwald September, 2001 Fred R. Conrad
A six-month investigation by New York Times reporter Kurt Eichenwald into online child pornography triggered a federal criminal investigation, the rescue of countless children from exploitation, and the gratitude of parents from around the world. Eichenwald told the stories of children who were encouraged by adults to perform sexually for Internet audiences by using inexpensive Webcams in the privacy of their bedrooms. In the process of reporting the story, Eichenwald convinced a teenager who had been performing online for five years to shut down his Web site, kick drugs, and turn over information on other children involved in online pornography to federal prosecutors. After the story was published, one tearful father told Eichenwald that the article had prompted him to check his son’s computer, where he found sexual communications through a “chat” feature in an online game his son played. The boy was 8 years old.

BIOGRAPHY
Kurt Eichenwald, a senior writer and investigative reporter at The New York Times, has written about corporate corruption and related topics for more than a decade. He began reporting for the paper’s business section in 1988. Earlier in his career he was a writer-researcher for CBS News in the election and survey unit, an associate editor at National Journal, and a news clerk for The New York Times in Washington and New York. Eichenwald, 44, was a winner of the George Polk Award in 1996 for his articles about deficiencies in the American system of kidney dialysis care. In 1998, he won another Polk Award for a series of articles about allegations of corruption at the nation’s largest private hospital chain, the Columbia/HCA Healthcare Corp. His most recent book, Conspiracy of Fools: A True Story, is about the Enron scandal. Born in New York City, Eichenwald graduated from Swarthmore College. He is married and has three children.

“Through His Webcam, a Boy Joins a Sordid Online World”

“Making a Connection With Justin”

• • • • • • • • • • • •

James Risen, Eric Lichtblau
The New York Times

CITATIONEric Lichtblau SO3392 WASHINGTON--9/15/98--ATTN:SARA GLEASON WASHINGTON REPORTER JIM RISEN.
The series of reports on American intelligence-gathering efforts began in almost an understated manner on December 16, 2005, with the headline “Bush Lets U.S. Spy on Callers Without Courts.” But in this lengthy–and superbly written and documented–article, James Risen and Eric Lichtblau signalled that a rock had been lifted from above one of the government’s most closely held secrets. In its prosecution of the war against terror, the Bush administration had authorized the National Security Agency to eavesdrop on the telephone and email conversations of thousands of Americans and others inside the United States–without warrants. By exposing the National Security Agency’s domestic wiretaps, Risen and Lichtblau brought an issue into public view that goes to the very heart of our democracy: whether the chief executive is accountable to the laws of the land–or is a law unto himself.

BIOGRAPHY
James E. Risen joined The New York Times as a correspondent in the Washington bureau, covering national security and intelligence, in May 1998. Previously, he served as a correspondent for the Los Angeles Times from 1984 to 1998, covering national security and intelligence, economics, and Detroit. From 1981 to 1984, he worked as a reporter for The Detroit Free Press covering the auto industry and labor. Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, Risen, 50, received a B.A. degree in history from Brown University and an M.S. degree in journalism from Northwestern University. He is married, has three children and lives in Maryland.

Eric Lichtblau joined The New York Times in September 2002 as Washington correspondent covering the Justice Department in the Washington bureau. Previously, Lichtblau was at the Los Angeles Times for 15 years, where he also covered the Justice Department in the Washington bureau from 1999 to 2002; before that, he did stints on the investigative team in Los Angeles and covered various law enforcement beats. Lichtblau was born in Syracuse, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University. Lichtblau and Risen were awarded a 2006 Pulitzer Prize for national reporting.

“Spying Program Snared U.S. Calls”

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Chris Rose
The Times-Picayune

CITATIONSuper Bowl Mugs
In the chaotic aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the people of New Orleans were scared and scattered about the country, grasping for meaning and searching for even a shred of hope. Fortunately, they had Chris Rose. Writing for The Times-Picayune, Rose gave his readers perspective and voiced their truths, offering insights and an emotional depth that news stories and photographs could not convey. In his columns, Rose created a front stoop where all of New Orleans could gather and begin again to feel like a community. In the words of one of his readers, Rose was an “elegant Everyman.” Writing about how he struggled to explain the aftermath of Katrina to his daughter, Rose quotes his daughter as asking him, “Is everything in New Orleans broken?” In Rose’s columns, he makes it clear that while New Orleans has been bent and banged up, it is far from broken.

BIOGRAPHY
Chris Rose began working at The Times-Picayune in the summer of 1984, covering crime in the suburb of Jefferson Parish and the politics of two small incorporated cities. Over the years, he covered local and national politics, general features, regional culture and economics, and New Orleans nightlife, music and personalities. Upon his return to New Orleans on the Monday after Hurricane Katrina, he began to cover the early stirrings of life in the streets and has stayed with that beat ever since, chronicling the city as it puts itself back together, shakes off its trauma, and tries to find footing as a viable community. The Pulitzer Prize Board named him a finalist in the commentary category for his post-Katrina columns. Rose, who was born in Washington, D.C. in 1960 and graduated from the University of Wisconsin in 1982, is a frequent commentator for National Public Radio’s Morning Edition and a writer/performer of several critically acclaimed stage shows in New Orleans. He is married with three young children.

“The Elephant Men” Part I, Part II

“1 Dead in Attic” Part I, Part II

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Cam Simpson
Chicago Tribune

CITATIONsimpson
In a gripping two-part series, Cam Simpson writes about an Iraq tragedy most of us probably never noticed: Last year 12 Nepalese men were kidnapped from an unprotected convoy traveling to an American military base in Iraq. They were eventually killed, an event captured in a grisly video. With the zeal of an investigator and the heart of a novelist, Simpson retraces what happened to the men. He travels to Nepal where he reconstructs, in heartbreaking detail, the circumstances that drove the 12 men to find work overseas. He then goes to the Middle East to reveal how large military support companies such as Halliburton use a string of shady contractors to lure poor men into dangerous work. These are victims of the Iraq war few would have mourned if not for Simpson.

BIOGRAPHY
Cam Simpson, 39, is a Washington-based correspondent for the Chicago Tribune. He covers U.S. foreign policy and also works on investigative projects in Washington and overseas. Simpson previously covered terrorism and the Department of Justice in Washington for the Tribune, and federal crime and organized crime in Chicago. Prior to joining the Tribune in 2000, Simpson worked for the Chicago Sun-Times, where he covered federal and organized crime, the FBI and U.S. courts. He has also worked for The Indianapolis Star, The Evansville Courier and The News-Gazette in Champaign, Ill. He is a native of St. Charles, Ill., and majored in political science and journalism at Eastern Illinois University. Simpson is a two-time winner of the George Polk Award, once for National Reporting and once for International Reporting. Simpson is the recipient of numerous other state, regional, national and international journalism awards, including the Overseas Press Club’s Madeline Dane Ross Award and the Tribune‘s own Edward Scott Beck Award for Foreign Reporting. He lives in Washington with his wife, Rima.

“Desperate for Work, Lured into Danger” Part I, Part II, Part III

“Into a War Zone, on a Deadly Road” Part I, Part II, Part III

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2005 FINALISTS

David Grann
The New Yorker

CITATIONgrann
“The Brand” by David Grann documents the rise and potential demise of the Aryan Brotherhood, a murderous gang that has spread its tentacles throughout the federal prison system and beyond. In his fearlessly reported and brilliantly written feature, Grann vividly depicts the brutal subculture of America’s maximum security penitentiaries. He also tells the inspiring story of how a gutsy prosecutor named Gregory Jessner took on the gang, at great personal risk. Grann shows how by indicting the Aryan Brotherhood, Jessner is striking a blow for the rights of some of the least sympathetic victims in our society — convicted, violent criminals who have become prey inside our prison walls.

BIOGRAPHY
David Grann, 38, has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since July 2003. His articles have covered everything from New York City’s antiquated water tunnels to the Aryan Brotherhood prison gang to the search for the giant squid. His stories have also been chosen for many anthologies and have appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The Atlantic Monthly, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, and The New Republic, where he is also a contributing editor. Before joining The New Yorker, Grann was a senior editor at The New Republic, and, from 1995 until 1996, executive editor of The Hill newspaper. Grann holds master’s degrees in international relations from The Fletcher School of Law & Diplomacy as well as in creative writing from Boston University. He graduated from Connecticut College in 1989. He lives in New York with his family.

“The Brand”
How the Aryan Brotherhood became the most murderous prison gang in America.

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Kim Murphy
Los Angeles Times

CITATIONmurphy
Kim Murphy doesn’t just cover the news. She tells stories that help her readers care about, and understand, the news. In reporting on Chechnya, she wrote a gripping piece about so-called “black widows”-female suicide bombers who stalk Russia. In her coverage of Chechen separatists who took hundreds of people hostage at a school in the Russian city of Beslan, she featured a 27-year-old Russian mother and hostage who was forced “to make a Sophie’s choice: Save one child and leave behind another, possibly to face death.” As Moscow bureau chief of the Los Angeles Times, Murphy wrote with authority and clarity about the political shift taking place under Russian President Vladimir Putin and its implications for U.S.-Russian relations. Her remarkable body of work reflects the range of stories that foreign correspondents-at their best-craft, often in very difficult circumstances and at great personal risk.

BIOGRAPHY
Kim Murphy, 49, has been a foreign and national correspondent for the Los Angeles Times for the past 15 years, covering assignments in Russia, the Middle East, the Balkans, Afghanistan, and the Pacific Northwest. She joined the paper in 1983 as a general assignment staff writer for the Orange County edition. Previously she worked as a reporter and assistant metro editor at the Orange County Register, a reporter at the Minot Daily News in North Dakota, and an assistant editor at the North Biloxian in Mississippi. Earlier this year she was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for international reporting. Her work has also been recognized by the Society of Professional Journalists, the Orange County Press Club, and the North Dakota Sigma Delta Chi, among others. A native of Indianapolis and a graduate of Minot State University, Murphy is married and has two children.

“Russian Hostage Crisis”
Russian Standoff Explodes.

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Maximillian Potter
5280 Magazine

CITATIONpotter
When the Air Force Academy announced in 2002 that it would court martial, for the first time, a cadet on charges of rape, the overwhelming public reaction was, “It’s about time.” Maximillian Potter’s reaction was to find out what happened. After he did, in a riveting piece in Denver’s city magazine, 5280, the charges against the 20-year-old cadet were dismissed. The cadet’s father later told Potter, “You saved my son’s life. Thank you.” The Air Force story was one of three extraordinary pieces by Potter submitted for the Michael Kelly Award. In his other stories, Potter uncovered evidence that called into question the handling by authorities of a 1975 murder of an American Indian activist and the 2004 suicides of two Army privates. Potter’s articles are hard to put down. They’re beautifully written, ambitious in intent, and-most of all-fearless in their pursuit of truth.

BIOGRAPHY
Maximillian Potter, 33, is the executive editor of Denver’s city magazine, 5280. Before joining 5280 in March 2004, Potter was a staff writer with Premiere magazine, Philadelphia magazine, and GQ. Potter has written often about crime, politics, the law and the military. He has received awards for narrative writing and reporting from organizations such as the Society of Professional Journalists and the City and Regional Magazine Association. This year Potter was a finalist for the Medill School of Journalism’s John Bartlow Memorial Award for Public Interest Journalism and for two National Magazine Awards, in the categories of Public Interest and Reporting. Potter, who is also writer-at-large for Best Life and Men’s Health magazines, is a graduate of Allegheny College and obtained a master’s degree from Northwestern University. A native of Philadelphia, he lives in Denver with his wife, Lori, and their two sons, Jack and True.

“Conduct Unbecoming”

“Broken Treaties”

“Private Sites Should Have Been Saved”

 • • • • • • • • • • • •

Elizabeth Rubin
The New York Times Magazine

CITATIONrubin
Elizabeth Rubin’s articles about Iraq and Saudi Arabia are both hopeful and discouraging. Hopeful in that she tells the stories of two people trying to do good-a feisty young lawyer from Oklahoma working to advance human rights in Iraq and a former radical Islamist in Saudi Arabia trying to encourage critical thinking and democracy in that country. Discouraging in that she chronicles the cultural obstacles that face both protagonists-obstacles so difficult that, in the case of the Oklahoma lawyer, they result in her death. With her eye for detail and knack for convincing people to open up to her, Rubin provides us with insights into the way Iraqis and Saudis think about themselves and the West. Readers come away from her stories with a much richer sense of two cultures that Americans ignore at their own peril.

BIOGRAPHY
Elizabeth Rubin started her career reviewing theater at the Vineyard Gazette on Martha’s Vineyard, before moving to The Forward as deputy cultural editor. In 1994 she went to Sarajevo for a six-week stint which lasted nearly two years. Her reportage in Harper’s about private armies, diamond wars, and state collapse in Sierra Leone was a National Magazine Award finalist and earned an Overseas Press Club citation for excellence. At The New Yorker, she won the Livingston Award for International Reporting for her story about a Ugandan rebel army of kidnapped children. After 9/11, she covered the U.S. wars in Afghanistan and Iraq for The New Republic and wrote about Russians, Chechens, Saudis, Iraqis, Iranians, and Americans abroad for The New York Times Magazine, where she is a contributing writer. A 2004-2005 Nieman Fellow, she was raised in Larchmont, N.Y. and earned a B.A. at Columbia University and an M.Phil. at Oxford.

“The Jihadi Who Kept Asking Why”

“Fern Holland’s War”

 • • • • • • • • • • • •

2004 FINALISTS

Dan Christensen
Miami Daily Business Review

CITATIONChristensen
Dan Christensen’s reporting on the suppression of all public record of federal court cases in the U.S. District Court of South Florida is a model of sharp instincts, courageous pursuit, and fearless reporting. Working his beat for the Miami Daily Business Review, Christensen exposed how federal judges had imposed, without explicit statutory or policy authority, information blackouts that hid the very existence of veiled cases. The habeas corpus petition of an Algerian immigrant held for five months in a post-9.11 roundup was sealed and wiped from the public record. The defendant in a narcotics trial was prosecuted, convicted, and imprisoned in total secrecy. In a period of new challenges to civil liberties and transparency in the wielding of state power, Dan Christensen has demonstrated the power of one committed reporter to unveil truth and forcefully illuminate an issue of high public interest.

BIOGRAPHY
Dan Christensen covers federal courts and writes a weekly news column for the 9,200-circulation Miami Daily Business Review— part of American Lawyer Media’s New York-based newspaper group. He’s been a reporter in South Florida for more than 25 years. In 2002, Christensen was a finalist in the Investigative Reporters and Editors national awards competition for stories that led to federal indictments against numerous Miami police officers involved in a deadly gun-planting conspiracy. Before joining the Review in 1989, Christensen was a general assignment reporter with investigative reporting duties at The Miami News. Earlier, he worked as a staff writer at what is today the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. Christensen grew up in Hillsdale, N.J. and earned undergraduate and graduate degrees at the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla.

“Secrecy Within”
Algerian native’s federal appeal in Miami has court altering records, closing hearing in name of security

 • • • • • • • • • • • •

Tom Junod
Esquire

CITATIONjunod
On September 12, 2001, The New York Times published a photograph of an unidentified man jumping from the North Tower of the World Trade Center. Two years later, Tom Junod wrote about his search to learn the identity of the man in a gripping account that forced readers to re-examine their feelings about what transpired that day. Junod’s story displayed intellectual fearlessness for exploring terrain avoided by other journalists, particularly after newspapers that ran the photo of the Falling Man were forced to defend themselves against charges that they were exploiting a man’s death. Touched in different ways by Junod’s piece, Esquire readers responded with hundreds of letters and thousands of calls—some thankful, some angry. “A common theme in the letters,” said Esquire Executive Editor Mark Warren, “is that the readers were not aware that they had anything more to feel about September 11, 2001, and that The Falling Man showed them otherwise.”

BIOGRAPHY
Tom Junod started his journalism career at Atlanta Magazine, before moving on to Life, Sports Illustrated, GQ, and Esquire. At GQ, Junod won two National Magazine Awards, the first for a profile of an abortion doctor, the second for a profile of a rapist undergoing therapy while enduring what is known as “civil commitment.” At Esquire, Junod has written profiles of Kevin Spacey, Hillary Rodham Clinton, Fred Rogers, and FBI counter-terrorist expert John O’Neill, among others, and reported on American hostages in Equador. His 2003 piece, “The Falling Man,” is a finalist for a National Magazine Award this year. Junod, 46, whose first job out of college was selling handbags, splits his time between Atlanta, Ga. and Shelter Island, N.Y. with his wife, Janet, and their daughter Antonia Li.

“The Falling Man”

 • • • • • • • • • • • •

John Lantigua
The Palm Beach Post

CITATIONlantigua
John Lantigua showed his readers, step by perilous step, what desperate migrants go through to cross the border into the United States. In a series of stories that sometimes echoed John Steinbeck, Lantigua wrote of a journey that has become so commonplace and yet so mysterious to most of us. To get up close and supply the sights and sounds of illegal immigration circa 2003, Lantigua endured many of the same dangers as the subjects of his stories. The result: A fearless report on people — our neighbors — who are willing to break the law and even risk death in the desert for the chance to find a better way for themselves and their impoverished families. His stories, part of a three-day series called “Modern-Day Slavery,” have prompted a Justice Department investigation into the treatment of undocumented Mexican farm workers.

BIOGRAPHY
A native of the Bronx, N.Y., John Lantigua, 57, worked at The Hartford Courant, UPI, and The Miami Herald before joining The Palm Beach Post in 2002. Lantigua shared the 1999 Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting while at The Miami Herald and also shared the Overseas Press Award and the National Magazine Award, both in 2002, for his work with Newsweek in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. A graduate of Jacksonville University in Florida, Lantigua has extensive reporting experience in Central America. He once ran his own camping business in the Sierra Madre of southern Mexico.

“Labor under lock and fist”
Migrants sealed in a trailer tell a clergyman that their labor contractors have ‘bought’ them from a smuggler.

 • • • • • • • • • • • •

George Packer
The New Yorker

CITATIONpacker
Twenty years from now, students looking for a definitive account of the troubled aftermath of the U.S. invasion of Iraq will no doubt turn to George Packer’s deeply reported 20,000-word piece in The New Yorker. Packer weaves the stories of individual Iraqis and Americans into a compelling narrative that provides readers with a wide-angle view of the situation in Iraq. His ability to get Iraqi civilians and American soldiers to open up to him and reveal their doubts and fears about the U.S. occupation makes his piece all the more riveting. Packer’s story is also notable for its reporting on how the Bush administration failed to adequately prepare for the problems that surfaced in Iraq after the fall of Baghdad. In pulling together many different strands of postwar Iraq, Packer provided an important service to Americans struggling to make sense of tumultuous times.

BIOGRAPHY
George Packer has been a staff writer for The New Yorker since May 2003. In addition to his coverage of Iraq, he has written on the atrocities committed in Sierra Leone, civil unrest in the Ivory Coast, and the Al-Jazeera satellite news channel. Packer was awarded two Overseas Press Club awards for his work in 2003, one for his Iraq coverage and the other for his reporting on the civil war in Sierra Leone. Packer, a 2001-2002 Guggenheim Fellow, has contributed articles, essays, and reviews on foreign affairs, American politics, and literature to The New York Times Magazine, Dissent, Mother Jones, Harper’s, and other publications. He has taught writing at Harvard, Sarah Lawrence, Bennington, and Columbia. Packer is the author of “The Village of Waiting” about his experience in Africa. His book “Blood of the Liberals” won the 2001 Robert F. Kennedy Book Award. He has also written two novels, “The Half Man” and “Central Square.” Packer was born and raised in the San Francisco Bay area. After graduating from Yale in 1982, he served in the Peace Corps in Togo, West Africa. He lives in Brooklyn, N.Y.

“War After the War”buy a paper
What Washington Doesn’t See in Iraq.

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